M-J’s Peanut Flour Waffles

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Above: M-J’s High-Protein Waffles are Sliced Thin and Filled with Ham, Cheese, and Dijon-Laced Mayonnaise for Low-Carb Panini (Grilled Sandwiches)

M-J’s Gluten-Free Peanut Flour Waffles

One egg

1/2 cup of buttermilk

1 1/2 cup of water

1 cup of peanut flour*

1 teaspoon of baking soda

1/2 teaspoon of salt

1 tablespoon of melted butter

1 teaspoon of brown sugar (optional; this bit of sucrose helps the waffles to caramelize)

1 tablespoon of lemon juice (optional, but it does add to the leavening)

1 teaspoon of vanilla (optional)

Approximately 5 drops or 1/4 cup of of sucralose sweetener (optional)

If your batter is too thick, add more water or milk. If you think it’s too thin, add a bit more peanut flour.

Brush a waffle iron with butter to prepare its surfaces. Heat your waffle iron, and be careful to add just enough batter to it for each waffle–I find that stopping short of the edges by an eighth of an inch will keep the batter from overflowing once the iron is closed. These waffles take approximately six minutes to bake. You can check on them by opening the waffle iron after four minutes.  For a savoury experience, these waffles are good with bacon and sour cream, and with chicken or roast beef as well.  Of course, these waffles are excellent with strawberries and whipped cream, or dusted with confectioners’ sugar.

©M-J de Mesterton 2016

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Wrapping the Waffles in Layers with Waxed Paper

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M-J’s Gluten-Free, Peanut Flour Waffles are Ready for the Freezer

*I use Protein Plus Peanut Powder. Here is their proprietary description:

Peanut flour is a dry powder formed after the partial extraction of oil from the roasted peanut seed. It is used to add flavor and protein to processed baked goods, nutrition bars and snacks, as well as to marinades, sauces and dressings. Worldwide, peanut flours have been limited to use by industrial food processors as a major food ingredient. While peanuts are about 25% protein, peanut flour is about 50% protein. That’s because the process of mechanically removing fatty oil from roasted peanuts enriches the levels of the remaining peanut components. The resulting flour is naturally low in fat, high in protein and relatively low in carbohydrates.

Protein Plus roasted peanut flour provides a healthful, lower-fat, and gluten free boost to a variety of foods. It is a great thickener for soups, a flavorful and aromatic ingredient for breads and pastries, as well as a creative coating for meats, fish, and other dishes. Peanut flour is a good source of Vitamin E, Folate, Fiber, Niacin, Magnesium, and Phosphorus.

Substitute at least 30% of your plain or self-rising wheat flour for peanut flour in any of your favorite recipes. Peanut flour is not self-rising and will need a rising agent added if called for in your recipe. When baking with peanut flour, you may want to add an extra egg or other moistening agent to prevent dryness.