Turmeric Tea, a Liver Detoxifier

Liver Tonic, Turmeric
Turmeric Tea, as Served on Okinawa

A Possible Weight-Loss Aid and Other Benefits of  Turmeric

In elegant survival, elegant survival health, Elegant Survival Kitchen Essentials, Elegant Survival Living on a Shoestring, Elegant Survival Recommendations, Elegant Survival tactics, Elegant Survival: Stylish Living on a Shoestring, Health, Health Concerns, Health Food on 24/04/2009 at 10:26 am

Researchers have determined that laboratory mice given a diet supplemented with curcumin experience a reduction in the formation of fat-tissue, and a lowered number of blood-vessels that feed fat. Curcumin is the active ingredient and major polyphenol in the bright yellow spice from India known as turmeric.

The growth and expansion of fat-tissues requires new blood vessels, a process known as angiogenesis. In fat-tissue, this process is mediated by the secretion of adipokines, such as leptin, adiponectin, resistin, interleukin-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The researchers first investigated the effect of curcumin in cultured human cells to which adipokines had been added to stimulate angiogenesis. They found that the ability of curcumin to inhibit angiogenesis was partly due to the reduced expression of VEGF. Subsequently, the mice were fed a high-fat diet supplemented with 500 milligrams curcumin per kilogram of food, for three months. Weight-gain was reduced in the mice who were given curcumin. The curcumin-supplemented mice had lower weight and reduced total-body fat. They also had lower liver-weights, and experienced a reduction in VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), indicating reduced risk for angiogenesis.

Also called “curcumin”, turmeric is a mustard-yellow spice from India. Indians use it more for its healing properties than for taste. Turmeric has an innocuous flavor, and adds colour to foods.

In India, turmeric has been revered for its healing properties, and thus is used as a daily dietary supplement.  In the Ayurvedic system of health, turmeric has medicinal properties and is an anti-inflammatory agent to treat a wide variety of conditions, including flatulence, jaundice, menstrual difficulties, bloody urine, hemorrhage, toothache, bruises, chest pain, and colic. Because of its effects on enzymes related to inflammation, turmeric may have the same mode of action as anti-inflammatory drugs, without the side-effects. Curcumin is used for cuts and burns and is known as an antiseptic/antibacterial. It is also used to remedy stomach-ulcers.

The U.S. National Institues of Health has four clinical trials in progress, involving curcumin as a treatment for pancreatic cancer, multiple myeloma, Alzheimer’s, and colorectal cancer. According to a 2005 article in the Wall Street Journal titled, “Common Indian Spice Stirs Hope,” research activity into curcumin, turmeric’s active ingredient, is burgeoning. Two-hundred and fifty-six curcumin-study papers were published in 2005, according to a search of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

 M-J de M., 2009

 

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Turmeric, a Spice for Longevity and Health


Turmeric as a Healing Spice; the Okinawa Program

Originally Posted on January 30, 2010 at 4:39 PM




The 2001 book, The Okinawa Program by Bradley J. Willcox, M.D., D. CraigWillcox, Ph. D., and Makoto Suzuki, M.D., is based upon the25-year-long Okinawa Centenarian Study. It is one of my favorite diet and health books.Turmeric has recently garnered respect and much publicity as a medicinal plant from the ginger family. The qualities of turmeric are not news to the famously long-living people of Okinawa, as related on page 149:


Excerpt:


Ucchin, or Turmeric M-J’s pronunciation note: TER-mer-ick


(Curcuma longa, Jiang Huang, Curcuma, Indian saffron, Ukon, Valerian)


Ucchin,commonly known in North America as turmeric, is one of the Okinawans’ favorite herbs (as it is in India), and claims a multitude of health benefits. It’s known as ukon to the Japanese….


Folkloric Claims


Turmeric is from the ginger family. The stalk of the plant is the part most commonly used in both herbal and traditional medicine, and is the part that provides the distinctive yellow-orange powder that adds flavor and color to curry. It was probably brought to Okinawa centuries ago from India, which had active trade relations with the Ryukyu Kingdom (as Okinawa was formerly known). In Ayurvedic medicine…turmeric is thought to strengthen the immune system, relieve inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, improve digestion, relieve gas, kill parasites and worms, alleviate menstrual problems, dissolve gallstones, and relieve other ailments. The Okinawans are in full accord with these claims, and highly prize their turmeric.


Excerpt, page 150


Turmeric possesses significant antioxidant properties, comparable to those of vitamins E or C, which is probably why it proves powerful against cancer. The American Institute for Cancer Research has reported some degree of inhibition for cancers of the GI tract, including oral, esophageal, stomach, and colon cancers. And, there is further evidence for its effectiveness against breast and skin cancers.


~~M-J de Mesterton, August 2009



Turmeric, a Spice for Longevity and Health


Turmeric as a Healing Spice; the Okinawa Program

Originally Posted on January 30, 2010 at 4:39 PM




The 2001 book, The Okinawa Program by Bradley J. Willcox, M.D., D. CraigWillcox, Ph. D., and Makoto Suzuki, M.D., is based upon the25-year-long Okinawa Centenarian Study. It is one of my favorite diet and health books.Turmeric has recently garnered respect and much publicity as a medicinal plant from the ginger family. The qualities of turmeric are not news to the famously long-living people of Okinawa, as related on page 149:


Excerpt:


Ucchin, or Turmeric M-J’s pronunciation note: TER-mer-ick


(Curcuma longa, Jiang Huang, Curcuma, Indian saffron, Ukon, Valerian)


Ucchin,commonly known in North America as turmeric, is one of the Okinawans’ favorite herbs (as it is in India), and claims a multitude of health benefits. It’s known as ukon to the Japanese….


Folkloric Claims


Turmeric is from the ginger family. The stalk of the plant is the part most commonly used in both herbal and traditional medicine, and is the part that provides the distinctive yellow-orange powder that adds flavor and color to curry. It was probably brought to Okinawa centuries ago from India, which had active trade relations with the Ryukyu Kingdom (as Okinawa was formerly known). In Ayurvedic medicine…turmeric is thought to strengthen the immune system, relieve inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, improve digestion, relieve gas, kill parasites and worms, alleviate menstrual problems, dissolve gallstones, and relieve other ailments. The Okinawans are in full accord with these claims, and highly prize their turmeric.


Excerpt, page 150


Turmeric possesses significant antioxidant properties, comparable to those of vitamins E or C, which is probably why it proves powerful against cancer. The American Institute for Cancer Research has reported some degree of inhibition for cancers of the GI tract, including oral, esophageal, stomach, and colon cancers. And, there is further evidence for its effectiveness against breast and skin cancers.


~~M-J de Mesterton, August 2009



Turmeric for Longevity and Health

Pronounced “tuRmeric” not “tumeric,” this spice is used in India and Japan for health and longevity. Turmeric can be used in cooking, or ingested in capsules. Turmeric is a well-researched anti-inflammatory agent, as well as a powerful antioxidant. Inflammation is the root of most ills and degenerative conditions in the human body.
©M-J de Mesterton
The 2001 book, The Okinawa Program by Bradley J. Willcox, M.D., D. CraigWillcox, Ph. D., and Makoto Suzuki, M.D., is based upon the25-year-long Okinawa Centenarian Study. It is one of my favorite diet and health books.Turmeric has recently garnered respect and much publicity as a medicinal plant from the ginger family. The qualities of turmeric are not news to the famously long-living people of Okinawa, as related on page 149:
Excerpt:
Ucchin, or Turmeric M-J’s pronunciation note: TER-mer-ick
(Curcuma longa, Jiang Huang, Curcuma, Indian saffron, Ukon, Valerian)
Ucchin,commonly known in North America as turmeric,  is one of the Okinawans’ favorite herbs (as it is in India), and claims a multitude of health benefits. It’s known as ukon to the Japanese….
Folkloric Claims
Turmeric is from the ginger family. The stalk of the plant is the part most commonly used in both herbal and traditional medicine, and is the part that provides the distinctive yellow-orange powder that adds flavor and color to curry. It was probably brought to Okinawa centuries ago from India, which had active trade relations with the Ryukyu Kingdom (as Okinawa was formerly known). In Ayurvedic medicine…turmeric is thought to strengthen the immune system, relieve inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, improve digestion, relieve gas, killl parasites and worms, alleviate menstrual problems, dissolve gallstones, and relieve other ailments. The Okinawans are in full accord with these claims, and highly prize their turmeric.
Excerpt, page 150
Turmeric possesses significant antioxidant properties, comparable to those of vitamins E or C, which is probably why it proves powerful against cancer. The American Institute for Cancer Research has reported somedegree of inhibition for cancers of the GI tract, including oral, esophageal, stomach, and colon cancers. And, there is further evidence for its effectiveness against breast and skin cancers.
~~M-J de Mesterton, August 2009

Turmeric for Longevity and Health

Pronounced “tuRmeric” not “tumeric,” this spice is used in India and Japan for health and longevity. Turmeric can be used in cooking, or ingested in capsules. Turmeric is a well-researched anti-inflammatory agent, as well as a powerful antioxidant. Inflammation is the root of most ills and degenerative conditions in the human body.
©M-J de Mesterton
The 2001 book, The Okinawa Program by Bradley J. Willcox, M.D., D. CraigWillcox, Ph. D., and Makoto Suzuki, M.D., is based upon the25-year-long Okinawa Centenarian Study. It is one of my favorite diet and health books.Turmeric has recently garnered respect and much publicity as a medicinal plant from the ginger family. The qualities of turmeric are not news to the famously long-living people of Okinawa, as related on page 149:
Excerpt:
Ucchin, or Turmeric M-J’s pronunciation note: TER-mer-ick
(Curcuma longa, Jiang Huang, Curcuma, Indian saffron, Ukon, Valerian)
Ucchin,commonly known in North America as turmeric,  is one of the Okinawans’ favorite herbs (as it is in India), and claims a multitude of health benefits. It’s known as ukon to the Japanese….
Folkloric Claims
Turmeric is from the ginger family. The stalk of the plant is the part most commonly used in both herbal and traditional medicine, and is the part that provides the distinctive yellow-orange powder that adds flavor and color to curry. It was probably brought to Okinawa centuries ago from India, which had active trade relations with the Ryukyu Kingdom (as Okinawa was formerly known). In Ayurvedic medicine…turmeric is thought to strengthen the immune system, relieve inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, improve digestion, relieve gas, killl parasites and worms, alleviate menstrual problems, dissolve gallstones, and relieve other ailments. The Okinawans are in full accord with these claims, and highly prize their turmeric.
Excerpt, page 150
Turmeric possesses significant antioxidant properties, comparable to those of vitamins E or C, which is probably why it proves powerful against cancer. The American Institute for Cancer Research has reported somedegree of inhibition for cancers of the GI tract, including oral, esophageal, stomach, and colon cancers. And, there is further evidence for its effectiveness against breast and skin cancers.
~~M-J de Mesterton, August 2009

Turmeric as a Healing Spice, from the Okinawa Program

This 2001 book, The Okinawa Program by Bradley J. Willcox, M.D., D. Craig Willcox, Ph. D., and Makoto Suzuki, M.D., is based upon the 25-year-long Okinawa Centenarian Study. It is one of my favorite diet and health books.

Turmeric has recently garnered respect and much publicity as a medicinal plant from the ginger family. The qualities of turmeric are not news to the famously long-living people of Okinawa, as related on page 149:

Excerpt:

Ucchin, or Turmeric M-J’s pronunciation note: TER-mer-ick

(Curcuma longa, Jiang Huang, Curcuma, Indian saffron, Ukon, Valerian)

Ucchin, commonly known in North America as turmeric,  is one of the Okinawans’ favorite herbs (as it is in India), and claims a multitude of health benefits. It’s known as ukon to the Japanese….

Folkloric Claims

Turmeric is from the ginger family. The stalk of the plant is the part most commonly used in both herbal and traditional medicine, and is the part that provides the distinctive yellow-orange powder that adds flavor and color to curry. It was probably brought to Okinawa centuries ago from India, which had active trade relations with the Ryukyu Kingdom (as Okinawa was formerly known). In Ayurvedic medicine…turmeric is thought to strengthen the immune system, relieve inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, improve digestion, relieve gas, killl parasites and worms, alleviate menstrual problems, dissolve gallstones, and relieve other ailments. The Okinawans are in full accord with these claims, and highly prize their turmeric.

Excerpt, page 150

Turmeric possesses significant antioxidant properties, comparable to that of vitamins E or C, which is probably why it proves powerful against cancer. The American Institute for Cancer Research has reported some degree of inhibition for cancers of the GI tract, including oral, esophageal, stomach, and colon cancers. And, there is further evidence for its effectiveness against breast and skin cancers.

A Possible Weight-Loss Aid in Turmeric

Researchers have determined that laboratory mice given a diet supplemented with curcumin experience a reduction in the formation of fat tissue, and a lowered number of blood-vessels that feed fat. Curcumin is the active ingredient and major polyphenol in the bright yellow spice from India known as turmeric.

The growth and expansion of fat tissues requires new blood vessels, a process known as angiogenesis. In fat tissue, this process is mediated by the secretion of adipokines, such as leptin, adiponectin, resistin, interleukin-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The researchers first investigated the effect of curcumin in cultured human cells to which adipokines had been added to stimulate angiogenesis. They found that the ability of curcumin to inhibit angiogenesis was partly due to the reduced expression of VEGF.
Subsequently, the mice were fed a high-fat diet supplemented with 500 milligrams curcumin per kilogram of food, for three months. Weight-gain was reduced in the mice who were given curcumin. The curcumin-supplemented mice had lower weight and reduced total-body fat. They also had lower liver-weights, and experienced a reduction in VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), indicating reduced risk for angiogenesis.

Also called curcumin, turmeric is a mustard-yellow spice from India. Indians use it more for its healing properties than for taste. Turmeric has an innocuous flavor, and adds color to foods.

In India, turmeric has been revered for its healing properties, and thus is used as a daily dietary supplement. In the Ayurvedic system of health, turmeric has medicinal properties and is an anti-inflammatory agent to treat a wide variety of conditions, including flatulence, jaundice, menstrual difficulties, bloody urine, hemorrhage, toothache, bruises, chest pain, and colic. Because of its effects on enzyme related to inflammation, turmeric may have the same mode of action as anti-inflammatory drugs, without the side-effects. Curcumin is used for cuts and burns and is known as an antiseptic/antibacterial. It is also used to remedy stomach-ulcers.

The U.S. National Institues of Health has four clinical trials in progress, involving curcumin as a treatment for pancreatic cancer, multiple myeloma, Alzheimer’s, and colorectal cancer. According to a 2005 article in the Wall Street Journal titled, “Common Indian Spice Stirs Hope,” research activity into curcumin, turmeric’s active ingredient, is burgeoning. Two-hundred and fifty-six curcumin-study papers were published in 2005, according to a search of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Making Deep-Fried Gyoza

noritake_rosewood_antique_fried_gyoza_copyright_m-j_de_mestertonmaking_gyoza_jfc_wrappers__m-j_de_mesterton_2017This batch of gyoza was made with a filling consisting of finely chopped carrots, celery, ginger, parsley, dill, matcha (dry green tea), miso, turmeric, cooked brown rice and adzuki beans. I used gyoza skins from Japan Foods, Inc., and sealed them with an egg-wash~~M-Jgyoza_deep_frying_elegant_cook_m-jgyoza_noritake_bowls_m-j_de_mesterton
Below: a Salad of Beneficial Daikon Radish and Romaine Lettuce, Dressed with a Simple Vinaigrette @M-J de Mestertongyoza_with_daikon_salad_m-j_elegant_cook

Health-Enhancing Cinnamon

 

Cinnamon_Sticks_Copyright_M-J_de_Mesterton

Cinnamon aids in the regulation of weight and lowers blood sugar. It is delicious on toast, apples, oatmeal, rice pudding, and in coffee or tea. I add cinnamon (and sometimes turmeric) to health-promoting smoothies.

Ingesting cinnamon helps to reduce the food-supply to tumors, and is a natural anti-inflammatory agent.

Cinnamon is rich in antioxidants, and is sometimes added to a foot-soak or a facial treatment to soften skin.

Tea made with cinnamon can soothe a sore throat.

Cinnamon may help to preserve one’s power of memory.

©M-J de Mesterton

Thunder-God Vine

Compound in Chinese Plant Kills Cancerous Tumors in 40 Days

Known as the ‘thunder god vine’ or lei gong teng, this Chinese plant is actually integrated into Chinese medicine and has been used for ages in remedying a number of conditions including rheumatoid arthritis.

According to new research at the University of Minnesota’s Masonic Cancer Center, a compound isolated from the thunder god plant led to “no evidence of tumors” after a 40-day period of ingestion by subjects, even after discontinuing the treatment. The results of this study, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health, were published in the journal Science Translational Medicine. The scientists working on the project were stunned by the anti-cancer properties of the compound. The thunder-god vine contains triptolide, a substance which has been identified as a cancer-fighter in previous research for its tumor-inhibiting properties.

Study leader and vice chairman of research at the Cancer Center,  Ashok Saluja explained  to Bloomberg News that he was blown away by the beneficial effects of such a simple plant: “This drug is just unbelievably potent in killing tumor cells,” he said.

As with numerous other powerful plant-substances like turmeric, dandelion and ginger, mainstream science is extremely reticent in confirming what many traditional practitioners have long recognized. This is likely because there is simply no money for major corporations in researching the healing powers of natural herbs and compounds such as that which is  found in the thunder god vine. Turmeric and ginger, for example, have been found to be amazing anti-cancer substances that are virtually free compared to expensive and dangerous cancer drugs. Cynical, disingenuous and venal elements within the behemoths running the pharmaceutical industry, and its regulators see no benefit to themselves, thus continue to discount the usage of  benign and relatively pure plant-based compounds and traditional spices in the treatment and prevention of cancer.

 Big Pharma-sponsored scientists have managed to ignore these spices as much as possible. In fact, they have often been caught  faking thousands of studies to fraudulently demonstrate the supposed value of pharmaceutical drugs pushed by giant pharma perps—many of which are later forced to pay millions in fines which only slightly stack up against their billions in profits.

Those profits are threatened by the many real studies that were performed by independent scientists examining the rejuvenating power of cheap ingredients like turmeric, which has been found by peer-reviewed research available on PubMed to positively influence over 590 conditions.

WARNING to the WISE

While it is great news that this study is bringing the beneficial effects of inexpensive plant-compounds to light, the bad news is that the individuals responsible for the aforementioned research are actually looking to create a pharmaceutical drug from the Chinese plant’s essential component, triptolide. A drug that Big Pharma will seek FDA approval for is likely to be nutritionally ruined by a mass-production process and sold for exorbitant amounts of cash. Before that eventuality, we ought to stock up on the benevolent stuff.

Source of  the preceding information: Natural Society

The Original Article Has Been Edited for Clarity and Language by Elegant Survival News

Related Stories at Natural Society:

Dr Stephen Holt: Antioxidants

From Dr Stephen Holt‘s Health Newsletter, which I receive from Vitacost (subscribe),

where we buy our nutritional supplements,

here is his list of minerals, plants and herbs with antioxidant potential:

Andrographis, Paniculata, Acanthopanax Senticosus, Green Tea, Turmeric, Grape Seed Extract, Zinc, Vitamin C, Ashwagandha, Oregon Grape, Shiitake Mushroom, Echinacea Purpurea, Goldenseal, Golden Thread, Aloe Vera, Astragalus, Korean Ginseng, Coriolus Versicolor, Active Hexose Correlate Compound (AHCC), Beta Glucan

Curcumin in the News Again

News Release from the Royal College of Psychiatrists:

Eating a curry once or twice a week could help prevent the onset of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. The magic ingredient in curry is curcumin, a component of the spice, turmeric.

Professor Murali Doraiswamy, director of the Mental Fitness Laboratory at the Department of Psychiatry, Duke University Medical Center, Carolina, told delegates at the Royal College of Psychiatrists’ Annual Meeting in Liverpool that curcumin prevented the spread of amyloid plaques, found outside brain cells.

These plaques, along with neurofibrillary tangles, are thought to contribute to the degradation of the wiring in brain cells and lead to the subsequent symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease.

Professor Doraiswamy said: “There is very solid evidence that curcumin binds to plaques, and basic research on animals engineered to produce human amyloid plaques has shown benefits. Turmeric has been studied not just in Alzheimer’s research but for a variety of conditions, such as cancer and arthritis. Turmeric is often referred to as the spice of life in ancient Indian medical lore.”

A clinical trial is now underway at the University of California, Los Angeles, to test curcumin’s effects in human Alzheimer’s patients and specifically on their amyloid plaque proteins. A small pilot trail was completed to determine the right dose and researchers have now embarked on a larger study.

Professor Doraiswamy told the Royal College of Psychiatrists’ Annual Meeting: “You can modify a mouse so that at about 12 months its brain is riddled with plaques. If you feed this rat a curcumin-rich diet it dissolves these plaques. The same diet prevented younger mice from forming new plaques. The next step is to test curcumin on human amyloid plaque formation using newer brain scans and there are plans for that.”

Studies looking at populations show that people who eat a curry meal two or three times a week seem to have a lower risk for dementia, he told the Annual Meeting. “Those studies seem to show that you need only consume what is part of the normal diet – but the research studies are testing higher doses to see if they can maximise the effect. It would be equivalent of going on a curry spree for a week.”

However, curry may be just one of the ingredients that prevent degeneration of the brain. “If you are eating fatty burgers and smoking then don’t expect an occasional curry to counterbalance a poor lifestyle. However, if you have a good diet and take plenty of exercise, eating curry regularly could help prevent dementia,” he said.

Turmeric is also found in mustard and Professor Doraiswamy predicted a day when – for those unable, or unwilling, to consume curries regularly – the public might be advised to take a ‘curry’ pill every day if the findings are confirmed in human studies.

Professor Doraiswamy and other scientists are testing a brain PET scan which can detect the prevalence of plaques in the living brain. At the moment, a definitive diagnosis can be made only after the patient has died. A second scan also being developed can detect both plaques and tangles – both of which are present in Alzheimer’s.

Many leading drugs being developed are targeting the plaques, said Professor Doraiswamy, and clinicians were prescribing these dugs “blindly” without knowing the plaque load in the brain. He said: “The hope is that with the PET scans you can scan their brains, find out whether their plaque load is high or low, and tailor treatment. If their plaque load is low, then you have to question the diagnosis.”

Some 20-30 per cent of diagnoses were wrong, said Professor Doraiswamy, and the condition could be vascular dementia or any number of other conditions masquerading as Alzheimer’s. “If you gave that person treatment it wouldn’t help – it would be a waste of money and in some cases hurt”.

The professor said it was conceivable in the near future, when preventive therapies were available, that a 50-year-old with a strong history of Alzheimer’s could be screened to determine the levels of plaque in their brains and then initiate anti-plaque therapy.

Professor Doraiswamy, a leading expert on brain health and fitness, grew up in Southern Indian town of Madras famous for its fiery curries. He is currently on a lecture tour promoting his consumer book The Alzheimer’s Action Plan, published in April.

Reference:
Annual Meeting of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, BT Convention Centre, Liverpool, 2 -5 June 2009

Source:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

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