The Wonderful Walnut

Walnuts Promote Good Health

Walnuts Help to Prevent Osteoporosis, Prostate and Breast Cancers; Walnuts Can Lower Your Levels of Bad Cholesterol and Promote a Healthy Heart

The following information was captured from California Walnut Growers, circa 2007 (the roguish FDA prohibits them from advertising the health-benefits of Walnuts–read the latest about walnuts at NaturalNews.com). Walnuts and other tree nuts and peanuts were recently ranked using the Index of Nutritional Quality (INQ) nutrient testing system at the Food Consulting Company of Del Mar, California [i]. According to Karen Duester, MS, RD who conducted the test, “Not surprisingly, walnuts ranked highest among the nuts in INQ. Because INQ relates to nutrient density, we looked at specific nutrients known to be abundant in nuts and peanuts: protein, fiber, omega-3, omega-6, vitamin E, potassium, magnesium, and zinc.”

On another independent scale, the Overall Nutritional Quality Index (ONQI)[ii] ranking system to be used by the Raley’s grocery chain, walnuts received 82 points on a 100 point scale, an excellent score among foods and nuts [iii]. According to David Katz, MD, MPH a nationally renowned authority on nutrition and the principal inventor for the ONQI system, “When overall nutritional quality is assessed, the verdict is clear: walnuts are a great food — they pack a lot of nutrient benefits in a nutshell!”
Jeffrey Blumberg, PhD, professor of nutrition science and policy at Tufts University and a member of the Hannaford Scientific Advisory Panel explains, “Walnuts are a whole food rich in antioxidants, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), an essential omega-3 fatty acid, protein, fiber, and more. Whole walnuts receive the ‘best nutritional value’ three star ranking (the highest) due to their nutrient profile.”
Walnuts have nutritional qualities that are very important. One of the richest sources of alpha linolenic acid (ALA), the plant form of Omega-3, walnuts are unique among nuts and popular whole foods [v]. A one ounce serving of walnuts provides 2.57 grams of ALA, the plant form omega-3s, which is above the dietary reference intake (DRI) set by the National Academies’ Institute of Medicine. Walnuts are also one of the highest natural sources of antioxidants, according to Halvorsen’s study from American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2006 [vi].
15 years of clinical research on walnuts have shown benefits for the heart, and we’re not just talking about cholesterol reduction — improved vascular function and a reduction in inflammation have also been documented [vii-xii]. Looking to the future and expanding on this base of knowledge, research is underway at a variety of prestigious universities looking into cancer, diabetes and issues of ageing.
[vi] Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jul;84(1):95-135
  “Supportive but not conclusive research shows that eating 1.5 ounces of walnuts per day, as part of a low saturated fat and low cholesterol diet, and not resulting in increased caloric intake may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.”
[viii]   Circulation. 2002 Nov 19;106(21):2747-57
[ix]     Hypertension. 2007 Aug;50(2):313-9
[x]     J Am Coll Cardiol. 2006 Oct 17;48(8):1666-71
[xi]    Arch Intern Med. 2007 Jun 11;167(11):1195-203.
[xii] Ann Intern Med. 2006 Jul 4;145(1):1-11

Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Walnuts

How do Omega-3s work?
Inside your favorite kinds of nuts — walnuts, almonds, pecans and others — you’ll find many vitamins, minerals and other compounds your body needs for good health. There are the antioxidants found in vitamin E; several essential minerals such as magnesium, selenium, copper and manganese; and even fiber for more effective digestion. Thiamin, niacin, folate, phosphorus and zinc are all found in nuts.
Researchers believe that omega-3 fatty acids may help reduce the risk of heart disease by making the blood less sticky and less likely to form dangerous intravenous or arterial clots. Studies have also shown that omega-3s may lower the risk of stroke and prevent arthritis. In addition, there’s good evidence that omega-3s can increase HDL (good cholesterol), further reducing the risk of stroke and heart disease.
The omega-3s found in fish oil are thought to be responsible for the significantly lower incidence of breast cancer in Japanese women as compared to women in the United States. This may be because omega-3 fatty acids inhibit the tumor growth that is promoted by the acids found in other fats, such as corn and safflower oils.
Finally, the brain itself is composed of a whopping 60 percent fat. It too needs omega-3s to help build and maintain tissue. Brain function itself may be at stake: in treating major depression, for example, omega-3s seem to work by making it easier for brain cell receptors to process mood-related signals from neighboring neurons.
What are good sources of omega-3s?
Omega-3 fatty acids are plentiful in cold-water fish such as mackerel and salmon. They’re also found in walnuts, canola oil, soybean oil, tofu and leafy green vegetables. Which would you rather sprinkle on your morning cereal or grab for a nutritious snack?

Walnuts are a delectable, convenient alternative to fish, tofu and leafy greens. In fact, just a handful of walnuts provides as much omega-3s as a comparable serving of salmon.

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Dr Stephen Holt: Antioxidants

From Dr Stephen Holt‘s Health Newsletter, which I receive from Vitacost (subscribe),

where we buy our nutritional supplements,

here is his list of minerals, plants and herbs with antioxidant potential:

Andrographis, Paniculata, Acanthopanax Senticosus, Green Tea, Turmeric, Grape Seed Extract, Zinc, Vitamin C, Ashwagandha, Oregon Grape, Shiitake Mushroom, Echinacea Purpurea, Goldenseal, Golden Thread, Aloe Vera, Astragalus, Korean Ginseng, Coriolus Versicolor, Active Hexose Correlate Compound (AHCC), Beta Glucan

The Health-Benefits of Red or Purple Cabbage

Health-Benefits of Red Cabbage
The Elegant Purple Cabbage is Brilliant in a Fresh Salad

The deep colour of red or purple cabbage is caused by a high concentration of anthocyanin polyphenols, giving it significantly more phytonutrients than green cabbage. Anthocyanin pigments are strong dietary antioxidants, and possess anti-inflammatory properties, meaning that they can play a role in protecting the human body from cancer and other degenerative diseases.

100 grams (about 3 ounces) of raw purple cabbage can contain as much as  196.5 milligrams of polyphenols, of which 28.3 milligrams are anthocyanins (deep red, blue and purple pigments found in plants). Green cabbage contains a comparatively low 45 milligrams of polyphenols, which include less than one milligram of anthocyanins. The “vitamin C equivalent,” which represents the antioxidant quotient of red or purple cabbage, is roughly eight times higher than that of green cabbage. Red cabbage is one of the most nutritious and potentially best-tasting vegetables on planet Earth. Shredded thinly and marinated in balsamic vinegar and olive oil, eating red cabbage is a powerful health-tonic. In my photograph of a purple cabbage salad, I have added yellow pear tomatoes and feta cheese to it for a colourful and nutritious dish.

Easy to grow, red or purple cabbage will continue to thrive until the garden has suffered many deep-frost nights.

©M-J de Mesterton

Red Cabbage Growing in the Kitchen Garden
Purple Cabbage in the Late-Autumn Garden
Raw Red Cabbage
Purple Cabbage, Grown at Home, by M-J de Mesterton

The Health-Benefits of Almonds

The Nutritional Aspects of Almonds
Almonds are the most nutritious of all nuts. Experts have discovered that consuming the natural fats and nutritional elements in almonds enhances one’s health in several ways.
Cancer Prevention – Almonds are low in saturated fat and contain many other protective nutrients – calcium and magnesium – for strong bones, vitamin E and compounds called phytochemicals, which may help protect against cardiovascular disease and even cancer.
Phytochemical Power-Pack – Leading nutrition scientists presented their research findings in a symposium entitled “Nuts in a Healthful Diet”, as a part of the 1998 Experimental Biology annual meeting. Dr. Gary Beecher (USDA-ARS), who has analyzed the phytochemical content of almonds, proclaimed, “I have never seen this diversity of phytochemicals in a single food source.”
Reducing Heart Attack Risk – In California, where almonds are farmed, a Loma Linda School of Public Health study indicated that people who consumed nuts five times a week had a 50% reduction in the risk of heart attacks.
Lowering Cholesterol – In one clinical study, Dr. Gene Spiller, Director of the Health Research and Studies Center, Inc., showed that adding almonds to one’s diet has a favorable effect on blood cholesterol levels. Nobody in the study-groups experienced weight gain.
Almonds contain rhizveritrol (or resveratrol), the anti-inflammatory agent found in red wines and thought to be responsible for the “French paradox”. Many scientists have pointed to the French consumption of red wine as one factor in the lower rate of heart disease despite their diets rich in cream sauces and buttery pastries. The fat in nuts is unsaturated, otherwise known as “the good fat”, and contains no cholesterol.
One ounce of almonds contains 12 percent of your daily allowance of protein, and absolutely no cholesterol. You’ll also get 35 percent of your daily allowance of vitamin E, that valuable antioxidant with so many cancer-fighting qualities.
The delicious almond is loaded with minerals like magnesium, phosphorus and zinc, as well as lots of healthy fiberCalcium and folic acid abound here as well.
No wonder almonds are a perennial favourite world-wide.
20-25 almonds (approximately one ounce) contain as much calcium as 1/4 cup of milk, a valuable tool in preventing osteoporosis.
Almonds are the best whole-food source of vitamin E, in the form of alpha-tocopherol, which may help prevent cancer.
Almonds are a great source of the folic acid which is so important to pregnant women.
Almonds contain more magnesium per unit than oatmeal or even spinach.
Build strong bones and teeth with the phosphorus in almonds.
Some naturally-occurring fats, such as those in almonds, are actually good for you. The American Heart Association has recently eased up on its recommendation that no more than 30 percent of our calories come from fat. They now say that additional fat is benign, as long as it’s unsaturated–like the good, mono-unsaturated fat found in almonds.
Almonds are rich in the vitamins and minerals that help to build a healthy heart, especially vitamin E. Almonds are cholesterol-free. A diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, but rich in the monounsaturated fat found in almonds, can help reduce heart disease.
Research conducted at Penn State University indicated that the phytochemicals in almonds inhibited tumor cell growth. A one-ounce serving of almonds provides more than 35 percent of your daily recommended dose of vitamin E. Other studies suggest that anti-oxidant vitamin E may protect against prostate and cervical cancers.
The calcium and monounsaturated fat found in almonds may lower risks of colon cancers. Almonds’ fiber content may also help protect against the disease. The folic acid in almonds may help reduce the risk of cervical cancers. Medical scientists in Finland have linked almonds to a reduction in risk of lung cancers.
~~M-J de Mesterton


Delicious Home-Roasted Almonds and New Products from Blue Diamond Almonds of California


The Health-Benefits of Almonds

The Nutritional Aspects of Almonds
Almonds are the most nutritious of all nuts. Experts have discovered that consuming the natural fats and nutritional elements in almonds enhances one’s health in several ways.
Cancer Prevention – Almonds are low in saturated fat and contain many other protective nutrients – calcium and magnesium – for strong bones, vitamin E and compounds called phytochemicals, which may help protect against cardiovascular disease and even cancer.
Phytochemical Power-Pack – Leading nutrition scientists presented their research findings in a symposium entitled “Nuts in a Healthful Diet”, as a part of the 1998 Experimental Biology annual meeting. Dr. Gary Beecher (USDA-ARS), who has analyzed the phytochemical content of almonds, proclaimed, “I have never seen this diversity of phytochemicals in a single food source.”
Reducing Heart Attack Risk – In California, where almonds are farmed, a Loma Linda School of Public Health study indicated that people who consumed nuts five times a week had a 50% reduction in the risk of heart attacks.
Lowering Cholesterol – In one clinical study, Dr. Gene Spiller, Director of the Health Research and Studies Center, Inc., showed that adding almonds to one’s diet has a favorable effect on blood cholesterol levels. Nobody in the study-groups experienced weight gain.
Almonds contain rhizveritrol (or resveratrol), the anti-inflammatory agent found in red wines and thought to be responsible for the “French paradox”. Many scientists have pointed to the French consumption of red wine as one factor in the lower rate of heart disease despite their diets rich in cream sauces and buttery pastries. The fat in nuts is unsaturated, otherwise known as “the good fat”, and contains no cholesterol.
One ounce of almonds contains 12 percent of your daily allowance of protein, and absolutely no cholesterol. You’ll also get 35 percent of your daily allowance of vitamin E, that valuable antioxidant with so many cancer-fighting qualities.
The delicious almond is loaded with minerals like magnesium, phosphorus and zinc, as well as lots of healthy fiberCalcium and folic acid abound here as well.
No wonder almonds are a perennial favourite world-wide.
20-25 almonds (approximately one ounce) contain as much calcium as 1/4 cup of milk, a valuable tool in preventing osteoporosis.
Almonds are the best whole-food source of vitamin E, in the form of alpha-tocopherol, which may help prevent cancer.
Almonds are a great source of the folic acid which is so important to pregnant women.
Almonds contain more magnesium per unit than oatmeal or even spinach.
Build strong bones and teeth with the phosphorus in almonds.
Some naturally-occurring fats, such as those in almonds, are actually good for you. The American Heart Association has recently eased up on its recommendation that no more than 30 percent of our calories come from fat. They now say that additional fat is benign, as long as it’s unsaturated–like the good, mono-unsaturated fat found in almonds.
Almonds are rich in the vitamins and minerals that help to build a healthy heart, especially vitamin E. Almonds are cholesterol-free. A diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, but rich in the monounsaturated fat found in almonds, can help reduce heart disease.
Research conducted at Penn State University indicated that the phytochemicals in almonds inhibited tumor cell growth. A one-ounce serving of almonds provides more than 35 percent of your daily recommended dose of vitamin E. Other studies suggest that anti-oxidant vitamin E may protect against prostate and cervical cancers.
The calcium and monounsaturated fat found in almonds may lower risks of colon cancers. Almonds’ fiber content may also help protect against the disease. The folic acid in almonds may help reduce the risk of cervical cancers. Medical scientists in Finland have linked almonds to a reduction in risk of lung cancers.
~~M-J de Mesterton


Delicious Home-Roasted Almonds and New Products from Blue Diamond Almonds of California


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