Super-Nutritious Smoothies

Jeanne’s Smoothie-Boosters for a Cancer-Preventing, Liver-Detoxifying, Health-Promoting Breakfast Drink:

Snip off a leaf of aloe vera per day and incorporate it into your morning health-drink.

CLICK HERE for M-J’sSECRET INGREDIENTS FOR DETOXIFICATION and IMMUNITY_BOOSTING

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The Wonderful Walnut

Walnuts Help to Prevent Osteoporosis, Prostate and Breast Cancers; Walnuts Can Lower Your Levels of Bad Cholesterol and Promote a Healthy Heart

The following information was captured from California Walnut Growers, circa 2007 (the FDA prohibits them from advertising the health-benefits of Walnuts–read the latest about walnuts at NaturalNews.com):Walnuts and other tree nuts and peanuts were recently ranked using the Index of Nutritional Quality (INQ) nutrient testing system at the Food Consulting Company of Del Mar, California [i]. According to Karen Duester, MS, RD who conducted the test, “Not surprisingly, walnuts ranked highest among the nuts in INQ. Because INQ relates to nutrient density, we looked at specific nutrients known to be abundant in nuts and peanuts: protein, fiber, omega-3, omega-6, vitamin E, potassium, magnesium, and zinc.”

On another independent scale, the Overall Nutritional Quality Index (ONQI)[ii] ranking system to be used by the Raley’s grocery chain, walnuts received 82 points on a 100 point scale, an excellent score among foods and nuts [iii]. According to David Katz, MD, MPH a nationally renowned authority on nutrition and the principal inventor for the ONQI system, “When overall nutritional quality is assessed, the verdict is clear: walnuts are a great food — they pack a lot of nutrient benefits in a nutshell!”
Jeffrey Blumberg, PhD, professor of nutrition science and policy at Tufts University and a member of the Hannaford Scientific Advisory Panel explains, “Walnuts are a whole food rich in antioxidants, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), an essential omega-3 fatty acid, protein, fiber, and more. Whole walnuts receive the ‘best nutritional value’ three star ranking (the highest) due to their nutrient profile.”
Walnuts have nutritional qualities that are very important. One of the richest sources of alpha linolenic acid (ALA), the plant form of Omega-3, walnuts are unique among nuts and popular whole foods [v]. A one ounce serving of walnuts provides 2.57 grams of ALA, the plant form omega-3s, which is above the dietary reference intake (DRI) set by the National Academies’ Institute of Medicine. Walnuts are also one of the highest natural sources of antioxidants, according to Halvorsen’s study from American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2006 [vi].
15 years of clinical research on walnuts have shown benefits for the heart, and we’re not just talking about cholesterol reduction — improved vascular function and a reduction in inflammation have also been documented [vii-xii]. Looking to the future and expanding on this base of knowledge, research is underway at a variety of prestigious universities looking into cancer, diabetes and issues of ageing.
[vi] Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jul;84(1):95-135
  “Supportive but not conclusive research shows that eating 1.5 ounces of walnuts per day, as part of a low saturated fat and low cholesterol diet, and not resulting in increased caloric intake may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.”
[viii]   Circulation. 2002 Nov 19;106(21):2747-57
[ix]     Hypertension. 2007 Aug;50(2):313-9
[x]     J Am Coll Cardiol. 2006 Oct 17;48(8):1666-71
[xi]    Arch Intern Med. 2007 Jun 11;167(11):1195-203.
[xii] Ann Intern Med. 2006 Jul 4;145(1):1-11

Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Walnuts

How do Omega-3s work?
Inside your favorite kinds of nuts — walnuts, almonds, pecans and others — you’ll find many vitamins, minerals and other compounds your body needs for good health. There are the antioxidants found in vitamin E; several essential minerals such as magnesium, selenium, copper and manganese; and even fiber for more effective digestion. Thiamin, niacin, folate, phosphorus and zinc are all found in nuts.
Researchers believe that omega-3 fatty acids may help reduce the risk of heart disease by making the blood less sticky and less likely to form dangerous intravenous or arterial clots. Studies have also shown that omega-3s may lower the risk of stroke and prevent arthritis. In addition, there’s good evidence that omega-3s can increase HDL (good cholesterol), further reducing the risk of stroke and heart disease.
The omega-3s found in fish oil are thought to be responsible for the significantly lower incidence of breast cancer in Japanese women as compared to women in the United States. This may be because omega-3 fatty acids inhibit the tumor growth that is promoted by the acids found in other fats, such as corn and safflower oils.
Finally, the brain itself is composed of a whopping 60 percent fat. It too needs omega-3s to help build and maintain tissue. Brain function itself may be at stake: in treating major depression, for example, omega-3s seem to work by making it easier for brain cell receptors to process mood-related signals from neighboring neurons.
What are good sources of omega-3s?
Omega-3 fatty acids are plentiful in cold-water fish such as mackerel and salmon. They’re also found in walnuts, canola oil, soybean oil, tofu and leafy green vegetables. Which would you rather sprinkle on your morning cereal or grab for a nutritious snack?

Walnuts are a delectable, convenient alternative to fish, tofu and leafy greens. In fact, just a handful of walnuts provides as much omega-3s as a comparable serving of salmon.

Dr. Leonard Coldwell, Cancer Expert Cites Causes and Statistics

86% of all doctor visits and illness, statistically,
are  based on stress or are stress-related.
Stanford University Study:  95% of all illness is stress-related.
The medical profession is the #1 cause of death in the
Western, so-called civilized world.
In the last 20 years, nobody has died of cancer;
rather, they have died from the side effects of the treatment.

Cancer is the biggest money maker in history
for the pharmaceutical industry.

There are over 300 to 400 known cancer cures that have virtually
no side effects and nearly a 100% cure rate.

The medical profession has a cancer cure rate of 2%.
If you do nothing, you have a 27% chance of recovery.

We are all born with cancer and cancerous cells,
and our immune system gets rid of it from Day 1.

The only cause for illness is lack of energy.

The main cause for lack of energy is
physical and emotional stress.

Bad relationships are the main cause of cancer.

~~Dr. Leonard Coldwell

Dr. Leonard Coldwell: His Answer to Cancer

Dr. Leonard Coldwell

Biography:

Leonard Coldwell is considered one of the leading proponents of self-help education for cancer patients and is referred-to by many authorities as a leading expert on the degenerative disease. After sixteen years as a General Practitioner in Europe, Dr. Coldwell left that practice to concentrate on his applied research in stress and stress-related diseases, with particular emphasis on cancer and other so-called “incurable” diseases.

While in Europe, Dr. Coldwell was the author of eight best-selling books, countless articles, and recorded hundreds of self-help audio programs. He remains a syndicated columnist with more than seven million readers and continues to write one of the most successful and widely distributed self-help newsletters in Europe. Over two million people have attended his life-enhancing seminars. An independent statistical institute estimated that Dr. Coldwell has worked with over 35,000 patients.

He hosts the widely popular radio show,  The Dr. Coldwell Report. With a listener-base in the tens of thousands each week, Dr. Coldwell is one of the leading voices when it comes to staying well naturally.

Tomatoes, a Gift to the World from the West

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_kxOMdiJWgFs/TCFsA8VjgZI/AAAAAAAAA0E/qIG0GOlx6AY/s1600/FamilyFoodSupply.jpg 

The savoury fruit once known as the “Love Apple” was long ago considered poison by some Europeans, and initially regarded with much scepticism. The wider world now knows these delicious, juicy orbs as “tomatoes.”

Tomatoes are a good source of vitamin C and potassium. They also contain plenty of phytochemicals that inhibit the development of certain degenerative diseases. Tomatoes are high in the strong antioxidant lycopene, and some phenolic compounds. In the average western diet, 95% of lycopene intake comes from tomatoes and tomato products. It is also found in watermelon, rose-hips, red grapefruit, and papayas.

Lycopene is the carotenoid that gives tomatoes their red tint. It appears that lycopene can reduce one’s susceptibility to certain cancers, the eye disorder known as age-related macular degeneration, atherosclerosis, and mitigate skin-damage from over-exposure to the sun.

Men who eat two or more servings of tomato products experience an average of 35 percent-less incidence of prostate cancer.

According to research done by the University of Illinois at Chicago, lycopene helps women to prevent the development of cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN), a tumorous tissue-growth in the cervix. Lycopene is a powerful inhibitor of the growth of breast, endometrium (inner lining of the uterus) and lung-cancer cells.

Some nutrients are, unfortunately, cooked away from other vegetables, but lycopene is better absorbed by the body when the tomatoes in which it is inherent are cooked with oil, as in a tomato sauce or paste. This is good news for those who like Italian and Mexican cooking, as well as for adherents of what is known as the Mediterranean diet. The cooking helps to break down the cell walls of the tomato releasing the lycopene and the oil helps to increase its absorption.

Japanese scientists have determined that mixing tomato juice into the drinking water of mice prevented them suffering the sort of emphysema that is brought on by the inhalation of tobacco-smoke.

Tomatoes contain lutein. Lutein is found in the retinas of our eyes, thus its ingestion promotes good vision. This substance also is believed by scientists to lower the risk of cataracts and macular degeneration, two negative eye-conditions. Lutein may also help to prevent atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries. Atherosclerosis contributes to cardiovascular disease.

Tomatoes and tomato-products are known to be effective in arresting aggressive, metastasizing cancers.

Tomatoes are believed to have originated in Peru, and were introduced into Europe in the 16th century. The genus tomato’s Latin name is Solanum Lycopersicum.

There are so many health-benefits from tomatoes, and such a variety of pleasant ways to ingest this colourful plant, that they are truly a gift from the western hemisphere to the rest of the world.

©M-J de Mesterton 2010

Tomatoes, a Gift to the World from the West

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_kxOMdiJWgFs/TCFsA8VjgZI/AAAAAAAAA0E/qIG0GOlx6AY/s1600/FamilyFoodSupply.jpg

The savoury fruit once known as the “Love Apple” was long ago considered poison by some Europeans, and initially regarded with much scepticism. The wider world now knows these delicious, juicy orbs as “tomatoes.”

Tomatoes are a good source of vitamin C and potassium. They also contain plenty of phytochemicals that inhibit the development of certain degenerative diseases. Tomatoes are high in the strong antioxidant lycopene, and some phenolic compounds. In the average western diet, 95% of lycopene intake comes from tomatoes and tomato products. It is also found in watermelon, rose-hips, red grapefruit, and papayas.

Lycopene is the carotenoid that gives tomatoes their red tint. It appears that lycopene can reduce one’s susceptibility to certain cancers, the eye disorder known as age-related macular degeneration, atherosclerosis, and mitigate skin-damage from over-exposure to the sun.

Men who eat two or more servings of tomato products experience an average of 35 percent-less incidence of prostate cancer.

According to research done by the University of Illinois at Chicago, lycopene helps women to prevent the development of cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN), a tumorous tissue-growth in the cervix. Lycopene is a powerful inhibitor of the growth of breast, endometrium (inner lining of the uterus) and lung-cancer cells.

Some nutrients are, unfortunately, cooked away from other vegetables, but lycopene is better absorbed by the body when the tomatoes in which it is inherent are cooked with oil, as in a tomato sauce or paste. This is good news for those who like Italian and Mexican cooking, as well as for adherents of what is known as the Mediterranean diet. The cooking helps to break down the cell walls of the tomato releasing the lycopene and the oil helps to increase its absorption.

Japanese scientists have determined that mixing tomato juice into the drinking water of mice prevented them suffering the sort of emphysema that is brought on by the inhalation of tobacco-smoke.

Tomatoes contain lutein. Lutein is found in the retinas of our eyes, thus its ingestion promotes good vision. This substance also is believed by scientists to lower the risk of cataracts and macular degeneration, two negative eye-conditions. Lutein may also help to prevent atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries. Atherosclerosis contributes to cardiovascular disease.

Tomatoes and tomato-products are known to be effective in arresting aggressive, metastasizing cancers.

Tomatoes are believed to have originated in Peru, and were introduced into Europe in the 16th century. The genus tomato’s Latin name is Solanum Lycopersicum.

There are so many health-benefits from tomatoes, and such a variety of pleasant ways to ingest this colourful plant, that they are truly a gift from the western hemisphere to the rest of the world.

©M-J de Mesterton 2010

>Tomatoes, a Gift to the World from the West

>

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_kxOMdiJWgFs/TCFsA8VjgZI/AAAAAAAAA0E/qIG0GOlx6AY/s1600/FamilyFoodSupply.jpg 

The savoury fruit once known as the “Love Apple” was long ago considered poison by some Europeans, and initially regarded with much scepticism. The wider world now knows these delicious, juicy orbs as “tomatoes.”

Tomatoes are a good source of vitamin C and potassium. They also contain plenty of phytochemicals that inhibit the development of certain degenerative diseases. Tomatoes are high in the strong antioxidant lycopene, and some phenolic compounds. In the average western diet, 95% of lycopene intake comes from tomatoes and tomato products. It is also found in watermelon, rose-hips, red grapefruit, and papayas.

Lycopene is the carotenoid that gives tomatoes their red tint. It appears that lycopene can reduce one’s susceptibility to certain cancers, the eye disorder known as age-related macular degeneration, atherosclerosis, and mitigate skin-damage from over-exposure to the sun.

Men who eat two or more servings of tomato products experience an average of 35 percent-less incidence of prostate cancer.

According to research done by the University of Illinois at Chicago, lycopene helps women to prevent the development of cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN), a tumorous tissue-growth in the cervix. Lycopene is a powerful inhibitor of the growth of breast, endometrium (inner lining of the uterus) and lung-cancer cells.

Some nutrients are, unfortunately, cooked away from other vegetables, but lycopene is better absorbed by the body when the tomatoes in which it is inherent are cooked with oil, as in a tomato sauce or paste. This is good news for those who like Italian and Mexican cooking, as well as for adherents of what is known as the Mediterranean diet. The cooking helps to break down the cell walls of the tomato releasing the lycopene and the oil helps to increase its absorption.

Japanese scientists have determined that mixing tomato juice into the drinking water of mice prevented them suffering the sort of emphysema that is brought on by the inhalation of tobacco-smoke.

Tomatoes contain lutein. Lutein is found in the retinas of our eyes, thus its ingestion promotes good vision. This substance also is believed by scientists to lower the risk of cataracts and macular degeneration, two negative eye-conditions. Lutein may also help to prevent atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries. Atherosclerosis contributes to cardiovascular disease.

Tomatoes and tomato-products are known to be effective in arresting aggressive, metastasizing cancers.

Tomatoes are believed to have originated in Peru, and were introduced into Europe in the 16th century. The genus tomato’s Latin name is Solanum Lycopersicum.

There are so many health-benefits from tomatoes, and such a variety of pleasant ways to ingest this colourful plant, that they are truly a gift from the western hemisphere to the rest of the world.

©M-J de Mesterton 2010

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