Burgundy-Style Wine in a Box


Elegant, Inexpensive Burgundy in a Box, by Almaden Vineyards

Wine isn’t used just for drinking in France; it is used in cookery, including the famous braised-beef dish boeuf bourguignon. Marinating and cooking meat  in Burgundy wine makes it very tender, with a robust flavour.
In the U.S., you may wish to keep a five-litre box of Almaden Mountain Burgundy (available at Sam’s and elsewhere for between 12 and 15 USD) in the kitchen for cooking. This way, a whole bottle of Burgundy, which can be expensive, doesn’t need to be opened when you just wish to add a half-cup of it to your dish. The wine is protected in an air-free vessel  inside the box, and is always at-hand for occasional use in cookery. Wine on-tap on top of the refrigerator is a great boon to any creative home-cook. 
©M-J de Mesterton 2010

Click Here to Read M-J’s Main Website, Elegant Survival

M-J’s Poulet à la Crême

Poulet à la Crême, a Smaller Version of M-J’s Recipe, Using Just Two Chicken Breasts for Two Persons



M-J’s Poulet à la Crême for a Dinner Party
Serves Eight Persons

Six boneless, skinless chicken breasts
Two cups of white wine (leftover champagne, or a combination of different white wines is also suitable)
One cup of water
Four tablespoons of butter
One third cup of white flour
One half-teaspoon of herbes de Provence
Salt and white pepper to taste
One half-cup of whipping cream

Melt one tablespoon of butter in a large frying pan. Add one cup of white wine or champagne and one cup of water, together with a sprinkling salt, the herbes de Provence and a little white pepper. Poach chicken breasts in the wine and water mixture until they are fully cooked; about forty-five minutes. Remove chicken breasts from pan and let them cool to room temperature. Most of the liquid will have evaporated, but retain what is left for the sauce.
Sauce Velouté
Pour the remaining poaching liquid into a cup. In the same pan, melt three tablespoons of butter. With a wire whisk, stir in 1/3 cup of white flour. Let this lightly brown until tan-coloured, then gradually add the remaining poaching liquid and one cup of white wine, whisking continually to prevent lumps. Incorporate the cream, and stop cooking after the sauce has thickened. Add a small bit of salt and white pepper to taste.
Slice the cooled chicken breasts into medallions. Pour 2/3 of the cream sauce into the bottom of an elegant buffet pan or serving dish, preferably one that is heat-proof, so that you may keep this dish covered and warm on a heating tray or cooker  for a little while before dinner is served.  On top of the cream sauce, line up the chicken medallions in a way that allows them to slightly overlap. Keeping the remaining third of the sauce hot and pourable, drizzle it over the arranged chicken just before distributing it among your dinner plates.

©M-J de Mesterton 2006

Click Here to Read M-J’s Latest Elegant Survivalist Posts

Elegant Pot Roast

Elegant Pot Roast of Beef Cooked in Burgundy with Herbes de Provence, Summer Savoury, Carrots, Onion,  and New Potatoes

>Elegant Pot Roast

>

Elegant Pot Roast of Beef Cooked in Burgundy with Herbes de Provence, Summer Savoury, Carrots, Onion,  and New Potatoes

Cooking with Wine: Burgundy in a Box

Wine isn’t used just for drinking in France; it is used in cookery, including the famous braised-beef dish boeuf bourguignon. Marinating and cooking meat  in Burgundy wine makes it very tender, with a robust flavour.
In the U.S., you may wish to keep a five-litre box of Almaden Mountain Burgundy (available at Sam’s and elsewhere for between 12 and 15 USD) in the kitchen for cooking. This way, a whole bottle of Burgundy, which can be expensive, doesn’t need to be opened when you just wish to add a half-cup of it to your dish. The wine is protected in an air-free vessel  inside the box, and is always at-hand for occasional use in cookery. Wine on-tap on top of the refrigerator is a great boon to any creative home-cook. 
©M-J de Mesterton 2010

Cooking with Wine: Burgundy in a Box

Wine isn’t used just for drinking in France; it is used in cookery, including the famous braised-beef dish boeuf bourguignon. Marinating and cooking meat  in Burgundy wine makes it very tender, with a robust flavour.
In the U.S., you may wish to keep a five-litre box of Almaden Mountain Burgundy (available at Sam’s and elsewhere for between 12 and 15 USD) in the kitchen for cooking. This way, a whole bottle of Burgundy, which can be expensive, doesn’t need to be opened when you just wish to add a half-cup of it to your dish. The wine is protected in an air-free vessel  inside the box, and is always at-hand for occasional use in cookery. Wine on-tap on top of the refrigerator is a great boon to any creative home-cook. 
©M-J de Mesterton 2010

>Cooking with Wine: Burgundy in a Box

>

Wine isn’t used just for drinking in France; it is used in cookery, including the famous braised-beef dish boeuf bourguignon. Marinating and cooking meat  in Burgundy wine makes it very tender, with a robust flavour.
In the U.S., you may wish to keep a five-litre box of Almaden Mountain Burgundy (available at Sam’s and elsewhere for between 12 and 15 USD) in the kitchen for cooking. This way, a whole bottle of Burgundy, which can be expensive, doesn’t need to be opened when you just wish to add a half-cup of it to your dish. The wine is protected in an air-free vessel  inside the box, and is always at-hand for occasional use in cookery. Wine on-tap on top of the refrigerator is a great boon to any creative home-cook. 
©M-J de Mesterton 2010

Cooking with Wine: Burgundy in a Box

Wine isn’t used just for drinking in France; it is used in cookery, including the famous braised-beef dish boeuf bourguignon. Marinating and cooking meat  in Burgundy wine makes it very tender, with a robust flavour.
In the U.S., you may wish to keep a five-litre box of Almaden Mountain Burgundy (available at Sam’s and elsewhere for between 12 and 15 USD) in the kitchen for cooking. This way, a whole bottle of Burgundy, which can be expensive, doesn’t need to be opened when you just wish to add a half-cup of it to your dish. The wine is protected in an air-free vessel  inside the box, and is always at-hand for occasional use in cookery. Wine on-tap on top of the refrigerator is a great boon to any creative home-cook. 
©M-J de Mesterton 2010

Cooking with Wine: Burgundy in a Box

Wine isn’t used just for drinking in France; it is used in cookery, including the famous braised-beef dish boeuf bourguignon. Marinating and cooking meat  in Burgundy wine makes it very tender, with a robust flavour.
In the U.S., you may wish to keep a five-litre box of Almaden Mountain Burgundy (available at Sam’s and elsewhere for between 12 and 15 USD) in the kitchen for cooking. This way, a whole bottle of Burgundy, which can be expensive, doesn’t need to be opened when you just wish to add a half-cup of it to your dish. The wine is protected in an air-free vessel  inside the box, and is always at-hand for occasional use in cookery. Wine on-tap on top of the refrigerator is a great boon to any creative home-cook. 
©M-J de Mesterton 2010

M-J’s Original Sauce Ragú

Sautéed Vegetables for M-J’s Sauce Ragú
Bread rises at left of stove, using the warmth from sautéed vegetables.
Click to Enlarge
The Second Stage of Cooking M-J’s Sauce Ragôut Involves Incorporating Liquid Ingredients
Third Stage of Cooking: Simmering for Nine Hours Yields a Rich, Dark Meat Sauce

This mixture of ground beef, celery, capsicums, bacon, onion, tomatoes, garlic, spices, herbs and wine will cook for nine or ten hours on very low heat, and become a zesty, rich meat sauce ragôut or ragú. Ideally, after the initial sautéeing and mixing process, the sauce would be put into a slow-cooker or Crock-Pot (by Rival).
Recipe and Photo Copyright M-J de Mesterton

>M-J’s Original Sauce Ragú

>

Sautéed Vegetables for M-J’s Sauce Ragú
Bread rises at left of stove, using the warmth from sautéed vegetables.
Click to Enlarge
The Second Stage of Cooking M-J’s Sauce Ragôut Involves Incorporating Liquid Ingredients
Third Stage of Cooking: Simmering for Nine Hours Yields a Rich, Dark Meat Sauce

This mixture of ground beef, celery, capsicums, bacon, onion, tomatoes, garlic, spices, herbs and wine will cook for nine or ten hours on very low heat, and become a zesty, rich meat sauce ragôut or ragú. Ideally, after the initial sautéeing and mixing process, the sauce would be put into a slow-cooker or Crock-Pot (by Rival).
Recipe and Photo Copyright M-J de Mesterton

>M-J’s Original Sauce Ragú

>

Sautéed Vegetables for M-J’s Sauce Ragú
Bread rises at left of stove, using the warmth from sautéed vegetables.

This mixture of ground beef, celery, capsicums, bacon, onion, tomatoes, garlic, spices, herbs and wine will cook for nine or ten hours on very low heat, and become a zesty, rich meat sauce ragout or ragú. Ideally, after the initial sautéeing and mixing process, the sauce would be put into a slow-cooker or Crock-Pot (by Rival).
Recipe and Photo Copyright M-J de Mesterton

M-J’s Original Sauce Ragú

Sautéed Vegetables for M-J’s Sauce Ragú
Bread rises at left of stove, using the warmth from sautéed vegetables.
Click to Enlarge
The Second Stage of Cooking M-J’s Sauce Ragôut Involves Incorporating Liquid Ingredients
Third Stage of Cooking: Simmering for Nine Hours Yields a Rich, Dark Meat Sauce

This mixture of ground beef, celery, capsicums, bacon, onion, tomatoes, garlic, spices, herbs and wine will cook for nine or ten hours on very low heat, and become a zesty, rich meat sauce ragôut or ragú. Ideally, after the initial sautéeing and mixing process, the sauce would be put into a slow-cooker or Crock-Pot (by Rival).
Recipe and Photo Copyright M-J de Mesterton

M-J’s Original Sauce Ragú

Sautéed Vegetables for M-J’s Sauce Ragú
Bread rises at left of stove, using the warmth from sautéed vegetables.
Click to Enlarge
The Second Stage of Cooking M-J’s Sauce Ragôut Involves Incorporating Liquid Ingredients
Third Stage of Cooking: Simmering for Nine Hours Yields a Rich, Dark Meat Sauce

This mixture of ground beef, celery, capsicums, bacon, onion, tomatoes, garlic, spices, herbs and wine will cook for nine or ten hours on very low heat, and become a zesty, rich meat sauce ragôut or ragú. Ideally, after the initial sautéeing and mixing process, the sauce would be put into a slow-cooker or Crock-Pot (by Rival).
Recipe and Photo Copyright M-J de Mesterton

M-J’s Original Sauce Ragú

Sautéed Vegetables for M-J’s Sauce Ragú
Bread rises at left of stove, using the warmth from sautéed vegetables.
Click to Enlarge
The Second Stage of Cooking M-J’s Sauce Ragôut Involves Incorporating Liquid Ingredients
Third Stage of Cooking: Simmering for Nine Hours Yields a Rich, Dark Meat Sauce

This mixture of ground beef, celery, capsicums, bacon, onion, tomatoes, garlic, spices, herbs and wine will cook for nine or ten hours on very low heat, and become a zesty, rich meat sauce ragôut or ragú. Ideally, after the initial sautéeing and mixing process, the sauce would be put into a slow-cooker or Crock-Pot (by Rival).
Recipe and Photo Copyright M-J de Mesterton

M-J’s Original Sauce Ragú

Sautéed Vegetables for M-J’s Sauce Ragú
Bread rises at left of stove, using the warmth from sautéed vegetables.

This mixture of ground beef, celery, capsicums, bacon, onion, tomatoes, garlic, spices, herbs and wine will cook for nine or ten hours on very low heat, and become a zesty, rich meat sauce ragout or ragú. Ideally, after the initial sautéeing and mixing process, the sauce would be put into a slow-cooker or Crock-Pot (by Rival).
Recipe and Photo Copyright M-J de Mesterton

Pot-Roast of Beef

An elegant gourmet dish when slow-cooked with wine, traditional roast beef is cooked alone or with any combination of potatoes, carrots, celery, turnips parsnips and onions.

Pot-Roast of Beef

An elegant gourmet dish when slow-cooked with wine, traditional roast beef is cooked alone or with any combination of potatoes, carrots, celery, turnips parsnips and onions.

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