Elegant Water Conservation

Flowering in the Desert

M-J’s Dry-Climate Garden with Cactus Zinnias, Sedum and Sunflowers
Water-Wise Gardening Photo ©M-J de Mesterton 2010

The price of water is going up, and its availability in some locations is scarce. There are some things you can do to keep whatever water you do have from going down the drain in vain.

Bathing usually uses less water than showering. Whether you bathe or shower, keeping the drain plugged will allow you to use this “grey water” later for other purposes.

Use the bath water to give your outdoor plants a drink. They especially like Epsom salts, a time-honored fertilizer in England.

Use a large, gallon-sized pitcher of bath water to flush your toilet. Pouring it down fast creates a flush; sometimes you will want to do this twice. A tubful of water can constitute twenty or more flushes. It works great.

While running water to get it hot, fill pitchers, glasses, any empty vessels you have handy until the water gets hot enough to use, saving the cooler water for drinking later.

When you bathe instead of shower, you usually use less water. To further enhance your water-saving program, carry the used bath-water outside in a large pail or pitcher to the garden. Plants don’t mind a bit of soap, and they especially adore Epsom Salts, which are well-documented as an effective fertilizer.

Water doesn’t grow on trees! In fact, there may come a time very soon when water is scarce. Look at the farmers in California who are not allowed to water their crops because of a tiny minnow that “must be saved”! I am more concerned about the future of the human race than I am about a useless minnow.
Copyright M-J de Mesterton, 2008

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>Xeriscaping in Boulder, Colorado

>

Boulder lives up to its name, with nearly every local house and institution employing rocks, gravel and boulders in their gardens. Rocks are beautiful, permanent and abundant natural resources. Stones do not require water, and can look very elegant. Xeriscape is a trademark of the nearby Denver Water Department, and means gardening with the minimum of water-usage.
©M-J de Mesterton May 11th, 2011

Xeriscaping in Boulder, Colorado

Boulder lives up to its name, with nearly every local house and institution employing rocks, gravel and boulders in their gardens. Rocks are beautiful, permanent and abundant natural resources. Stones do not require water, and can look very elegant. Xeriscape is a trademark of the nearby Denver Water Department, and means gardening with the minimum of water-usage.
©M-J de Mesterton May 11th, 2011

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