My Favourite Measuring Spoons

Best_Measuring-Spoons_Elegant_Cook_M-J_de_MestertonI like to keep my measuring spoons separate instead of on a ring, for ease of use. Aedilys_Measuring_Spoon_Set_Elegant_Cook_M-J

They’ve finally designed a set of measuring spoons that are engraved with both U.S. and metric capacities, shaped to fit into small containers, have four-inch handles, and are made of 18/8 stainless steel. Please visit M-J’s Traditional Household.

Elegant Walnut Salad

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Simple and satisfying, a salad made with Romaine lettuce and crushed walnuts may be enhanced with Cheddar cheese to make a nutritious luncheon dish.  The best dressing for M-J’s Walnut-Romaine salad recipe is a honey-laced vinaigrette.  For an elegant salad-design, toss the lettuce in dressing before arranging the crushed walnuts around the edges of your bowl. ©M-J de MestertonRomaine__Elegant_Salad_Copyright_M-J_de_Mesterton

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Home-Made Pizza

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I made my own pizza-dough as usual, and fitted it into a copper pan, decorated with sauce, cheese, parsley and pepperoni, then popped it into a 400-degree oven. This is the gorgeous pie that slipped right out of my pan onto a trivet.

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Here is another home-made pizza, fashioned with dough from my versatile pain de mie recipe. The soft stuff was stretched onto a 14″ round Granite-Wear pizza pan that gives the bottom of the light dough a crispy finish.Home-Made_Pizza_Elegant_Cook_M-J_de_Mesterton

©M-J de Mesterton, March 2017

 

Deep-Fried Gyoza

gyoza_deep-fried_copyright_m-jeanne_de_mesterton_elegant_cookGyoza skins were filled with health-promoting ingredients: purple cabbage, cooked adzuki beans, celery, carrot, red onion, cooked brown rice, chopped umeboshi plums and miso; I sealed them with an egg-wash and then the gyoza dumplings were deep-fried in peanut oil and drained on paper towels. I served half of these and froze the rest (it’s the only way to keep them; storing these deep-fried pockets of finely minced vegetables, legumes and rice in the fridge will make them too soft). The frozen “gyozas” will be spread in a single layer and reheated in a hot oven. @M-J de Mesterton 2017

Eggs Help Prevent Stroke and Heart Disease

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One large egg typically contains six grams of high-quality protein, the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin (a substance in egg yolks), as well as significant amounts of the important vitamins E, D, and A.

Vitamin E has been proven to reduce the risk of coronary attacks in people with heart disease, while lutein helps to protect against clogging of the arteries.

A study concluded at EpidStat Institute in November, 2016 found that consuming just one egg a day reduces risk of stroke by 12 percent. The study’s principal investigator, Epidemiologist Dr. Dominik Alexander, said: “Eggs do have many positive nutritional attributes, including antioxidants, which have been shown to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation. They are also an excellent source of protein, which has been related to lower blood pressure.”

U.S. scientists have found that, contrary to traditional perceptions acquired from decades of less rigorous research, consuming eggs had no association with coronary heart disease, which is on record as the leading cause of death worldwide.

©M-J de Mesterton 2017

M-J’s Article about Eggs, Published in 2010

Eggs don’t cause heart disease, as the medical industry previously believed. And here is more good news: a research team at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge determined that women on a weight-loss regimen who ate an egg with toast and jelly each morning lost twice as many pounds as those who had a bagel breakfast with the same number of calories without the accompanying egg.

Huevos (Eggs), by Spanish Court Painter Diego Velasquez

Eggs are nutritious, convenient, useful in thousands of recipes, and are a relatively inexpensive source of high-quality protein.

One large egg, which represents less than 4 percent of the total daily calorie intake of a person who consumes 2000 calories per day, provides 10 percent of the Daily Value for protein, 15 percent of the Daily Value for riboflavin, and 4 percent or more of the Daily Value for several other nutrients, including vitamins A, B6 and B12; folate; iron; phosphorus; and zinc. Eggs also provide choline, which is  essential in the human diet, and is credited for helping to create healthy babies during pregnancy. Because the percentage of the  recommended  daily amount for many nutrients provided by an egg is greater than the proportion of total calorie intake that the egg represents, the egg more than pulls its weight nutritionally. Most of the vitamins and minerals in eggs are found in the yolk; protein, however, is found in both the yolk and the white.

Recent research indicates that egg eaters are more likely than non-egg eaters to have diets that provide adequate amounts of essential nutrients. This seems to be partly due to the nutritional contribution of the eggs themselves and partly due to the fact that the inclusion of eggs in the diet is an indicator of a desirable eating pattern that includes breakfast.

Eggs can be prepared easily, in a variety of ways. They keep well  in the refrigerator for about three weeks, and therefore an individual can easily use up the dozen eggs in a carton before they spoil. Because most egg recipes involve short cooking times, eggs are convenient for the person with little time to prepare meals.

Eggs have several important physical and chemical properties that help make recipes work. They thicken custards, puddings and sauces; emulsify and stabilize mixtures such as mayonnaise and salad dressings; coat or glaze breads and cookies; bind ingredients together in dishes such as meat loaf and lasagne; eggs are used to clarify coffee and soups; retard crystallization in boiled candies and frostings; and leaven some types of baked goods such as cakes, cookies, soufflés, buns and sponge cakes.

Eggs are economical, especially when compared to other high-protein foods. For people who are trying to balance their budgets as well as their diets, serving eggs occasionally instead of meat, poultry, or fish is very economical.

One other  benefit of eggs is that they are a functional food—that is, a food which provides health benefits that go beyond basic nutrition. Eggs contain the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, two components which are believed to have health benefits.

Stocking up on dehydrated eggs would be a wise move right now.  There are many sources of dried or powdered eggs on ebay and the internet. I prefer to dessicate and process them at home. Here is my procedure:

Emergency Powdered Eggs

Cook the desired amount of eggs in a non-stick pan until they are scrambled dry. On a a large baking-sheet, place your scrambled eggs in a thin layer. Use a French chef’s knife or a pastry cutter to break them into smaller pieces. In a low oven around 130 degrees Fahrenheit, bake this tray of eggs for eight hours or until it is devoid of moisture. Using a hand-mill, meat-grinder, food-mill or a blender, process the eggs until they turn to powder. Store the dried egg powder in an air-tight, food-grade container.

©M-J de Mesterton 2010

Reversal of Long-Held Beliefs on Dietary Fats

Additional Information on Foods Containing Cholesterol

A heart specialist from the University of Ireland, Professor Sherif Sultan, notes:

  • Current dietary guidelines are outmoded and desperately need to be revised.
  • Despite decades-old recommendations, high carbohydrate diets should be avoided.
  • Diets consisting largely of foods high in good-quality fats are the healthiest.
  • This essential changeover will stem the epidemic of Type 2 diabetes and weight-related heart problems.

Making Croutons

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A half-loaf of home-made sourdough bread was a couple days old, and tired of being stored in the fridge. I decided to make croutons with it for the week’s luncheon salads. I poured olive oil, spices, parsley and fresh rosemary into a Pop-It storage box (made with safe materials in Italy), then tossed the bread squares in and shook the thing with all my might to coat them well. With ambient heat from the oven while baking the croutons, a new loaf of bread was rising nearby. Sliced thinly, the croutons were ready after ten minutes in a 350° oven. Cooled croutons were poured into elegant jars to be used at table. And they won’t need to be stored for long; these croutons will quickly be poured out onto salads. @M-J de Mesterton

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Don’t Waste Lemon Peels: Make Marmalade

 

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Lemons are dear. I never waste any part of them. Squeezed-out lemons are cut finely, with just the seeds removed, then boiled for an hour with non-GMO sugar, water, and fruit pectin. Refrigerated in a recycled jar with a pretty lid, my citrus marmalade easily replaces an expensive glass of “Bonne Maman”. So, after you make lemonade, you might just want to make marmalade. ~~M-J

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Article at Natural News, by Regular Contributor J.D. Heyes

The Elegant, Nutritious Parsnip

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Parsnips are rich in potassium, vitamin C, folate, and soluble fiber. They grow underground, and belong to the same vegetable family as celery, carrots and parsley.

Parsnips are delicious when cooked in beef stew, or baked as an accompaniment to roast beef. Adding a boiled parsnip when making mashed potatoes will lend pleasant, interesting flavour to that classic dish. The parsnip is a versatile root vegetable which can be used for soup, grated into salad or braised with potatoes, celeriac and carrots, or julienned and deep-fried as chips.
©M-J de Mesterton 2016

Elegant, Nutritious Sweet Potatoes and Yams

Sweet Potatoes and Yams

Posted on January 20, 2012 at 7:45 PM

 

Our friends at Paleo Works in Yorkshire have written a wonderful essay about a dietary marvel known as the sweet potato, which includes delightful preparation and serving suggestions. Read it HERE, and while on their page, you can read about the sensible, successful Paleo Diet. Below, please find a recipe for a health-promoting salad that I devised using yams and red cabbage or  beets. The Okinawan people of Japan have for centuries relied upon yams as a central component of their diet, and attribute their traditional great longevity to the tasty tubers.

A refreshing way to eat health-promoting vegetables, this elegant cabbage and yam salad is also a nice thing to serve your friends: red cabbage is sliced as thinly as possible, and marinated for several hours in the vinaigrette of your choice, then mixed with yams that have been cut into match-sticks and cooked in water with a bit of honey until slightly soft. The red cabbage may be substituted with beets cut into match-stick shapes and cooked until just soft, then marinated in vinaigrette.
Recipe and Photo©M-J de Mesterton

Elegant Chicken Salad

Poached chicken in a  lettuce salad, with fresh lemon and vegetable oil dressing, ground green peppercorn and salt–how elegant and health-promoting it is. I would have made Chicken Jubilee from Beverly Barbour’s book, “Secret Recipes from Private Clubs,” but I had no tomato. I did, however, use a green pepper from my garden to replace it.  This simple chicken salad is a refreshing dish for summer luncheon.

©M-J de Mesterton

Baked Alaska, an Elegant Classic Dessert

A classic pound-cake is hollowed-out in the middle, filled with vanilla ice cream, topped with meringue, and baked for a few minutes until the edges are lightly-browned. This “Alaska” cake  is ready to be baked.
©M-J de Mesterton
 birthday cake, Classic Recipe, Cuisine, Elegant Cookery, Elegant Cooking, Elegant Dessert, Elegant Dinner Party, Elegant Dishes | Tagged Baked Alaska, Classic Dessert, Elegant Classic Dessert, Elegant Cook,Elegant Cookery, Elegant Dessert, Elegant Living, Ice Cream, Pound Cake, Stylish Living

Baked Alaska, an Elegant Classic Dessert

A classic pound-cake is hollowed-out in the middle, filled with vanilla ice cream, topped with meringue, and baked for a few minutes until the edges are lightly-browned. This “Alaska” cake  is ready to be baked.
©M-J de Mesterton
 birthday cake, Classic Recipe, Cuisine, Elegant Cookery, Elegant Cooking, Elegant Dessert, Elegant Dinner Party, Elegant Dishes | Tagged Baked Alaska, Classic Dessert, Elegant Classic Dessert, Elegant Cook,Elegant Cookery, Elegant Dessert, Elegant Living, Ice Cream, Pound Cake, Stylish Living

Baked Alaska from a Pound Cake

Courtesy of M-J de Mesterton, the Elegant Cook

A classic pound-cake is hollowed-out in the middle, filled with vanilla ice cream, topped with meringue, and baked for a few minutes until the edges are lightly-browned. This “Alaska” cake  is ready to be baked.

©M-J de Mesterton