M-J’s Elegant Little Kitchen Island

Small Functional Kitchen-Copyright_M-J_de_Mesterton (1)A sturdy stainless steel cart with a custom-cut Melamine surface serves as a work-island in M-J’s tiny kitchen, and attached hooks hold her heavy French cast-iron pans. The smaller stainless steel cart has a butcher-block surface, together with two shelves that hold a basket of potatoes, a wooden Zeissen coffee-grinder, assorted porcelain platters and baking-dishes. ©M-J de Mesterton 2018

 

 

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Home-Grown Radishes

The Elegant Radish, Edible in its Entirety
The Elegant, Entirely Edible Radish, an Easy-to-Grow Vegetable

I grew these radishes using only home-made, all-vegetal compost for fertiliser.

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Salad with Radish Greens, Photo Copyright M-J de Mesterton

Three ounces of radish greens contain on average 200mg (20% RDA) of calcium. They also provide 13% of the human RDA (recommended daily allotment) of iron, and  vitamins A (280% RDA) and C (173% RDA). All vegetable-greens are high in vitamin K. magnesium and other beneficial minerals.

This elegant salad is composed of radish greens, cucumbers, and home-roasted almonds. My dressing is a vinaigrette made with white wine vinegar, olive oil, dry mustard, salt, and a few drops of honey.
©M-J de Mesterton 2011

Radishes with Soft Butter, a Traditional Component of Breakfast in France: the Elegant Radish is a Liver-Tonic

The Beautiful, Beneficial Beet

This home-garden-grown baby beetroot was washed, steamed for five minutes, then dressed with olive oil and a few drops of balsamic vinegar. The root, bulb and leaves were consumed by your faithful editor. Grown in soil with only kitchen compost as a fertiliser, and no pesticides, this exquisite, nutritious beet was part of a health-promoting luncheon. Here is an article in the Wellness Times about the many health-benefits of beets, by Jacob Schor, ND, FABNO. Dr Schor recommends drinking beet juice as well as eating the richly-coloured, elegant vegetables.

©M-J de Mesterton

Making Sausage at Home

Merguez avec Brioche
M-J's Home-Made Brioche with Sausage

Why bother making your own sausage? Because you can choose the sort of casings and ingredients, ensuring that you won’t be ingesting something that makes you cringe. For example, I think the beef-collagen casings sound more appetising (if there is such a thing where sausage casings are concerned) than “natural” ones. Here is a SAUSAGE-LINK. The SausageMaker.com has everything one needs to make sausage at home, except the meat.

I received an email notice from Chefs.com this morning, which contained a plug for the Kitchenaid Mixer’s Breakfast Kit. It includes a sausage-making attachment, a juicing tool, and something to help one make salsa. I am intrigued by this, and it is now on my wish-list. If I ever acquire the breakfast tool kit, I shall review it here at Elegant Survival News.

©M-J de Mesterton

Elegant Pantry

Elegant Pantry

Arrange pantry items in groups of similar containers for a well-organised appearance.

VISIT M-J de Mesterton’s ELEGANT PANTRY

RSS The Elegant Cook, M-J de Mesterton

Elegant Blonde Willow Blend

Starbucks’ Blonde Willow Coffee: Do Not Confuse Light Roast with Weak Cup!
Fresh-tasting and robust, Starbucks’ new Blonde Roast is coffee the way it tasted in the United States and Scandinavia before the dark-roast craze made everyone forget…. Yes, there is a good, old-fashioned coffee available in the ubiquitous Starbucks cafés, and you can take home a bag of the ground beans and brew it to your desired strength. My Scandinavian mother-in-law brought me this bag of Starbucks Blonde Willow Blend ground coffee lately, and as I made it for dessert in our French press, we passed it round the table so that we could breathe-in its lovely aroma. Usually, coffee smells better than it tastes, but not in this case–Starbucks’ new offering, which I brewed using two tablespoons per cup because we Scandinavians prefer it strongly-brewed–tastes delightful (many who patronise Starbucks confuse strongly-brewed with darkly-roasted, and they are two vastly different things).
©Jeanne “M-J” de Mesterton

Salad Served in Stunning Style

SIMPLE SALAD in an ELEGANT BOWL
Elegant Salad
A simple salad is served in an elegant antique Noritake bowl.
Photo ©Copyright Jeanne “M-J” de Mesterton

Beneficial Salad Tastes Better in a Beautiful Bowl

Napa cabbage, orange peppers, cayenne pepper and feta cheese are served in an antique Noritake bowl made by Baron Morimura in Japan in the early 20th century. Napa cabbage has a finer leaf than regular cabbage, but I think it needs to be softened considerably by marinating for several hours in vinegar and oil. The marinating process can be accelerated by setting your bowl of thinly-sliced Napa cabbage and marinade in a microwave oven at the defrost-setting for three minutes or slightly longer. I used white wine vinegar and olive oil for this health-promoting salad.  To this bowl of simple cabbage, I added diced sweet mini-peppers, bits of home-grown cayenne pepper, and feta cheese. There you have a cruciferous, low-calorie vegetable, a heart-healthy combination of peppers that contain vitamin C, olive oil that is good for your blood, vinegar that adjusts your body’s acidity, and a little protein from the cheese.

Serving something-not-so-special in a sumptuous style makes healthy eating less boring, don’t you think?

©Jeanne “M-J” de Mesterton