Soprano Ruthilde Boesch, Elegant Survivor


The famous operatic voice-instructor and professional soprano from Austria, Ruthilde Bosch, was ninety-four years old  when she passed away this year.

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Hatred Makes You Ugly

By M-J de Mesterton

Have you ever noticed that the more resentful and jealous a woman is, the more wrinkles she has? The most important age-preventing measure for your face is being a member of the Clear Conscience Club–you know, the one whose members get a good night’s sleep. When people carry around the burdens of hatred and envy, resentments and greed, these destructive inner elements inevitably manifest themselves on their faces. Here is a quote from an interview by Linda Holmes with elegant, ageless singer Darlene Love, whose work in the 1960s with music innovator Phil Spector catapulted her to fame and made her into the exploited victim of a megalomaniac who was ethically-challenged, and for whom loyalty was a foreign concept:

“I have no reason to hate him,” she says, “and I never did, because I always found that hate makes you ugly. Makes you have wrinkles. Which I don’t have.” Here, she laughed. “But you know what? That has a whole lot to do with your insides. When you hate people, it not only makes you hate that person, it gives that vibe off for everything around you. I really do believe that. So I really did try hard not to dislike him and always be the good guy, and say what I say about him and nothing bad. ‘Cause it doesn’t help.”

 

 

Geneviève de Galard, The Angel of Dien Bien Phu

Geneviève de Galard, The Angel of Dien Bien Phu, has been featured on my Elegant Survivors page for many months. This exceedingly valiant heroine and her husband live in Paris….

Here is an excerpt from a letter by the editor of Geneviève de Galard’s autobiography, William Hopanski:

Geneviève asked me to translate her recent video from the French , and you will see my translation superimposed. I ask that you share the video with as many people as possible, and especially send it to teachers of French classes in high schools and colleges near you. Geneviève dedicated many years to working with and for young people, and she hopes that her story will inspire many of them to do what they can to promote freedom worldwide.

Following is the introduction I wrote in 2010 for AUSA, delivered by a general during Geneviève’s reception and book signing in Washington. It will give you an overview of this remarkable person and the enormous challenge she overcame.

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“In the spring of 1954, with the Free World engaged in a global struggle to contain Communism, all eyes were on a French garrison in a remote northwestern corner of Vietnam: Dien Bien Phu. Fifteen thousand French Union forces were surrounded by a 35,000 man Viet Minh army, supported by a 300,000-strong supply and labor force. Hanoi was 180 air miles distant, and wounded and dying needed to be evacuated from the airstrip which was under almost constant artillery bombardment.

A young French flight nurse had flown through antiaircraft fire into and out of this hell many times. On 28 March 1954, her evacuation aircraft succeeded in landing in the dark, but ran into barbed wire which ruptured the oil tank. After daylight the disabled aircraft was spotted and destroyed by artillery. This was the last plane to land at Dien Bien Phu. She was trapped.

What follows is the story of an incredibly skillful, compassionate, courageous young woman who for 57 days, to include 17 as a prisoner of the enemy, gave treatment and hope to those men who with profound respect and affection called her “our Geneviève,” and whom the American press named, “The Angel of Dien Bien Phu.” After her release, President Eisenhower invited her to the United States where she received a tickertape parade up Broadway, a standing ovation in Congress, and the Medal of Freedom from the president at the White House. It is an extraordinary honor to introduce Geneviève de Galard, ‘The Angel of Dien Bien Phu.'”

~~William Hopanski, Editor

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Evelyn Lauder

Mrs. Leonard Lauder


Evelyn Lauder:

The Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF), was founded in 1993 by Evelyn H. Lauder,
Senior Corporate Vice President of The Estée Lauder Companies, Inc. 
Mrs. Leonard Lauder passed away on Saturday, November 12th, from magnetic ovarian cancer at age 75. Always tasteful in her personal presentation, Evelyn Lauder was elegant, beautiful and
kind. 



Click Here to Read M-J’s Main Website, Elegant Survival

Doña Juana de Castilla-León y Aragón

Don Felipe (Philip of Hapsburg) and Doña Juana 
Joanna, Queen of Castile and Aragon

From Wikipedia:


Portrait by Juan de Flandes, ~1500

Queen of Castile and León

Reign 26 November 1504 – 12 April 1555 (50 years, 137 days)
Predecessors Isabella I & Ferdinand V
Successor Charles I
Co-sovereign Philip I
Charles I

Queen of Aragon

Reign 23 January 1516 – 12 April 1555 (39 years, 79 days)
Predecessor Ferdinand II
Successor Charles I
Co-sovereign Charles I
Spouse Philip I of Castile
Issue
Eleanor, Queen of Portugal and France
Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor
Isabella, Queen of Denmark
Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor
Mary, Queen of Bohemia
Catherine, Queen of Portugal
House House of Trastámara
Father Ferdinand II of Aragon
Mother Isabella I of Castile
Born 6 November 1479
ToledoSpain
Died 12 April 1555 (aged 75)
TordesillasSpain
Burial Capilla RealGranadaSpain

Doña Juana, or Joanna, Queen of Castile






A myth created by her sick husband and perpetuated by her father, who was trying to issue a replacement-heir by his second wife, Germaine, that Doña Juana was “mad,” kept her from long-term power. “Juana la Loca” was very well-educated. The princess, countess and queen was an excellent student of court etiquette, dance, music, and equestration. Doña Juana–Joanna–was fluent in French, Latin and all of the Iberian Romance languages: Castilian, Leonese, Galician-Portuguese and Catalan.

To be continued….
©M-J de Mesterton

Doña Juana de Castilla-León y Aragón

Don Felipe (Philip of Hapsburg) and Doña Juana 
Joanna, Queen of Castile and Aragon

From Wikipedia:


Portrait by Juan de Flandes, ~1500

Queen of Castile and León

Reign 26 November 1504 – 12 April 1555 (50 years, 137 days)
Predecessors Isabella I & Ferdinand V
Successor Charles I
Co-sovereign Philip I
Charles I

Queen of Aragon

Reign 23 January 1516 – 12 April 1555 (39 years, 79 days)
Predecessor Ferdinand II
Successor Charles I
Co-sovereign Charles I
Spouse Philip I of Castile
Issue
Eleanor, Queen of Portugal and France
Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor
Isabella, Queen of Denmark
Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor
Mary, Queen of Bohemia
Catherine, Queen of Portugal
House House of Trastámara
Father Ferdinand II of Aragon
Mother Isabella I of Castile
Born 6 November 1479
ToledoSpain
Died 12 April 1555 (aged 75)
TordesillasSpain
Burial Capilla RealGranadaSpain

Doña Juana, or Joanna, Queen of Castile






A myth created by her sick husband and perpetuated by her father, who was trying to issue a replacement-heir by his second wife, Germaine, that Doña Juana was “mad,” kept her from long-term power. “Juana la Loca” was very well-educated. The princess, countess and queen was an excellent student of court etiquette, dance, music, and equestration. Doña Juana–Joanna–was fluent in French, Latin and all of the Iberian Romance languages: Castilian, Leonese, Galician-Portuguese and Catalan.


©M-J de Mesterton

Uniting the Crowns of Castile and Aragon
The marriage of Ferdinand II and Queen Isabella I of Castile, in 1469 at the Palacio de los Vivero in Valladolid, began a familial union of the two kingdoms. They became known as the Catholic Monarchs (los Reyes Católicos). Isabella succeeded her brother as Queen of Castile and Ferdinand became jure uxoris King of Castile in 1474. When Ferdinand succeeded his father as King of Aragon in 1479, the Crown of Castile and the various territories of the Crown of Aragon were united in a personal union creating for the first time since the 8th century a single political unit referred to as España (Spain). ‘Los Reyes Católicos’ started policies to diminish the power of the bourgeoisie and nobility in Castile, and greatly reduced the powers of the Cortes (General Courts) to the point where they sanctioned the monarchy’s acts, and brought the nobility to their side.


The 16th Century

On Isabella’s death in 1504 her daughter, Joanna I, became Queen (in name) with her husband Philip I as King (in authority). After Philip I’s death in 1506, Joanna’s father Ferdinand II was regent, due to her perceived mental illness, as her son Charles I was only six years old. On Ferdinand II’s death in 1516, Charles I was proclaimed as king of Castile and of Aragon (in authority) jointly with his mother Joanna I as the Queen of Aragon (in name).[3] He became known as Charles V. As the first royal to reign over both Castile and Aragon he may be considered as the first operational King of Spain.

Government

As with all medieval kingdoms, supreme power–the Divine Right of Kings– was understood to reside in the monarch “by the grace of God,” as the legal formula explained. Nevertheless, rural and urban communities began to form assemblies to issue regulations to deal with everyday problems. Over time, these assemblies evolved into municipal councils, known as variously as ayuntamientos or cabildos, in which some of the inhabitants, the property-owning heads of households (vecinos), represented the rest. By the fourteenth century these councils had gained more powers, such as the right to elect municipal magistrates and officers (alcaldes, speakers, clerks, etc.) and representatives to the parliaments (Cortes).
Due to the increasing power of the municipal councils and the need for communication between these and the King, cortes were established in the Kingdom of León in 1188, and Castile in 1250. In the earliest Leonese and Castilian Cortes, the inhabitants of the cities,  commonly called laboratores  (workers),  formed a small group of  representatives who had no legislative powers, but served as a link between the king and the general population, a social mechanism instituted by the kingdoms of Castile and León. Eventually, representatives of the cities, or las ciudades, were granted the right to vote in the Cortes, often in alliance with the monarchs against the grandees or great noble lords.


The Kingdom of Castile Canting Arms

During the reign of Alfonso VIII, the kingdom began to use as its emblem, both in blazons and banners, the canting arms of the Kingdom of Castile: gules, a three-towered golden castle, masoned sable and ajouré azure.


Protect Yourself from Hospital-Acquired Diseases

 

Ginger for Colds and Flu
Eating Ginger Helps to Kill Cold and Flu Viruses

Last night we called our dear friend Sandra, who regularly visits friends in Seattle’s hospitals. She is a retired nurse in her 70s. She had been to visit a friend of hers in the hospital a few weeks ago, and sensed that there was something being coughed into the air by a patient in the general vicinity. Sandra did what she could to prevent being infected, but when she got home realized that she felt under-the-weather already. The cold that she caught at the hospital has lingered for weeks. We recommended that she take Zicam and raw ginger. We ended our conversation as she left for the store to buy those two things, and Sandra promised to let us know her status very soon–whether these two remedies work. It is best to take these things as as soon as you feel a cold or flu coming on.

This morning, I saw a recent editorial on the People’s Pharmacy entitled, “Be Vigilant to Avoid Harm in the Hospital.” It warns of  a number of bugs and maladies one can be infected with just by visiting the hospital, some of them hard-to-cure and antibiotic-resistant,  and explains precautions to take when being treated there.

©M-J de Mesterton

Edwin Newman, Elegant Survivor, 1919-2010

The brilliant, amusing journalist and English pundit Edwin Newman passed away on September 13th in Oxford, England at the age of 91. Every time I saw his books in our home library, I prayed to God that the author was doing all right and enjoying life. Mr. Newman was our keynote speaker at the English-Speaking Union World Conference in Princeton circa 1997. There, I took photos of the great television newsman speaking, and had him sign my copy of “I Must Say.” I read his hilarious, incisive book, “Strictly Speaking,” on an airplane when I was seventeen, which taught me much and enhanced my love of the language. Thank you, Edwin Newman!

When I recover from the sad news of his passing, I shall return with a couple of Newman quotations, and if I am able to locate them, some snap-shots.

©M-J de Mesterton; September 15th, 2010
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