Home-Grown Radishes

The Elegant Radish, Edible in its Entirety
The Elegant, Entirely Edible Radish, an Easy-to-Grow Vegetable

I grew these radishes using only home-made, all-vegetal compost for fertiliser.

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Salad with Radish Greens, Photo Copyright M-J de Mesterton

Three ounces of radish greens contain on average 200mg (20% RDA) of calcium. They also provide 13% of the human RDA (recommended daily allotment) of iron, and  vitamins A (280% RDA) and C (173% RDA). All vegetable-greens are high in vitamin K. magnesium and other beneficial minerals.

This elegant salad is composed of radish greens, cucumbers, and home-roasted almonds. My dressing is a vinaigrette made with white wine vinegar, olive oil, dry mustard, salt, and a few drops of honey.
©M-J de Mesterton 2011

Radishes with Soft Butter, a Traditional Component of Breakfast in France: the Elegant Radish is a Liver-Tonic

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The Beautiful, Beneficial Beet

This home-garden-grown baby beetroot was washed, steamed for five minutes, then dressed with olive oil and a few drops of balsamic vinegar. The root, bulb and leaves were consumed by your faithful editor. Grown in soil with only kitchen compost as a fertiliser, and no pesticides, this exquisite, nutritious beet was part of a health-promoting luncheon. Here is an article in the Wellness Times about the many health-benefits of beets, by Jacob Schor, ND, FABNO. Dr Schor recommends drinking beet juice as well as eating the richly-coloured, elegant vegetables.

©M-J de Mesterton

Old-Fashioned Stuffed Celery

For an uncomplicated appetiser, fill celery with a mixture of cream cheese, mayonnaise, chopped olives and perhaps some minced hot peppers. ©M-Jeanne de Mesterton
Elegant Stuffed Celery

To freshly washed celery segments, add a mixture of cream cheese, mayonnaise, and chopped olives. Here, I have added some minced serrano peppers. ©Jeanne “M-J” de Mesterton 2012

Salad Served in Stunning Style

SIMPLE SALAD in an ELEGANT BOWL
Elegant Salad
A simple salad is served in an elegant antique Noritake bowl.
Photo ©Copyright Jeanne “M-J” de Mesterton

Beneficial Salad Tastes Better in a Beautiful Bowl

Napa cabbage, orange peppers, cayenne pepper and feta cheese are served in an antique Noritake bowl made by Baron Morimura in Japan in the early 20th century. Napa cabbage has a finer leaf than regular cabbage, but I think it needs to be softened considerably by marinating for several hours in vinegar and oil. The marinating process can be accelerated by setting your bowl of thinly-sliced Napa cabbage and marinade in a microwave oven at the defrost-setting for three minutes or slightly longer. I used white wine vinegar and olive oil for this health-promoting salad.  To this bowl of simple cabbage, I added diced sweet mini-peppers, bits of home-grown cayenne pepper, and feta cheese. There you have a cruciferous, low-calorie vegetable, a heart-healthy combination of peppers that contain vitamin C, olive oil that is good for your blood, vinegar that adjusts your body’s acidity, and a little protein from the cheese.

Serving something-not-so-special in a sumptuous style makes healthy eating less boring, don’t you think?

©Jeanne “M-J” de Mesterton

Broccoli with M-J’s Swiss Cheese Sauce

Elegant, Nutritious Broccoli Covered with Swiss Raclet-Style Cheese Sauce
Broccoli with M-J's Swiss Cheese Sauce, Ready to Bake until Golden Brown

Make a roux with flour and butter, Brown it slightly, then add milk or cream very swiftly while whisking it in the saucepan. Add Swiss cheese, and a little water to help blend the mixture. Incorporate Dijon mustard to taste. Salt and white or green pepper may be added if you need more flavour. Drizzle this cheese sauce over par-boiled broccoli which has been placed in a buttered baking dish. Bake in a medium-hot oven until the sauce is lightly golden.

©M-J de Mesterton

M-J's Swiss Cheese Sauce on Par-Boiled Broccoli

Elegant Health Salad

Elegant Vegetable Salad for Good Health

Cucumbers, celery and red onions all chopped finely and dressed with vinegar and olive oil comprise a health-promoting salad. This elegant vegetable dish is refreshing in summer, and can help to prevent colds in winter. Vinegar helps to adjust your body’s alkalinity to the desired level, and olive oil is beneficial to the heart, reduces corporeal inflammation, and is now commonly known as an anti-cancer food.

©M-J de Mesterton

Winter Health Smoothie

Vegetables Blended for a Health-Promoting Smoothie

An Elegant, Nutritious Drink for Winter Health: M-J’s Vegetable Smoothie
Buttermilk, lemon juice, raw broccoli, celery, jalapeño pepper, and cucumber blended together make an excellent breakfast tonic.
©M-J de Mesterton

M-J’s Original Piquant Yam Casserole



Boiled yams, sliced fresh jalapeños, crushed pineapple and cream cheese are seasoned to your taste (I use Tajín chile-lime-salt seasoning from México) and baked in a dish after being crushed and mixed with my Braun hand-mixer.
©M-J de Mesterton
Thanksgiving, 2011


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Click Here to Read M-J’s Main Website, Elegant Survival

M-J’s Original Yam Dish


Boiled yams, sliced fresh jalapeños, crushed pineapple and cream cheese are seasoned to your taste (I use Tajín chile-lime-salt seasoning from México) and baked in a dish after being crushed and mixed with my Braun hand-mixer.
©M-J de Mesterton
Thanksgiving, 2011

It’s Time to Strengthen Your Health with Yams and Sweet Potatoes

Yams and Sweet Potatoes Baked or Added to Fall and Winter Dishes Will Enhance Your Health

The Elegant Yam: a Versatile, Health-Promoting Root-Vegetable

Eating yams or sweet potatoes every day is believed to be one of the reasons the people of Okinawa, Japan, have the longest average life expectancy in the world.

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, the yam is “neutral” in nature–somewhere between yin and yang. Its properties can help to tranquilise the mind, preserve youthful skin, nourish the spleen, stomach, kidneys, aid in digestion, and contribute to a feeling of fullness, something that can aid both dieters and poor people.

Yams contain vitamin B6, which can soothe the mind as well as boost immunity. Rich in linoleic acid and fibre, yams not only help to alleviate constipation, but can also reduce cholesterol build-up blood vessels, a process which helps prevent arteriosclerosis and thrombosis.

The yam is rich in protein, vitamins A , E and C, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, iron, magnesium, and potassium. Although its vitamin B1 and B2 content is six and three times higher than that of rice respectively, 100 grams (3.5 ounces) of yams produce only 99 calories, a one-third the amount that rice contains. Because yams are alkaline foods, they can help decrease body fat. Acid foods lead to fat-storage in the human body. Yams and sweet potatoes also contain lycopene, which is believed to help prevent prostate cancer. A hormone-like, anti-inflammatory compound called dioscin exists in both yams and sweet potatoes, as well as vitamin C and carotenoids.

Sweet potatoes and yams have the same qualities, even though they are from different families, so substituting the root-vegetable known as sweet potato for yams is perfectly acceptable and will yield the same health-results when eaten. If the yam or sweet potato is too sweet for your liking, there are several ways to incorporate them into your diet that will make them seem less so. For example, a well-scrubbed yam may be chopped into matchsticks or slivers, fibrous skin and all, and added to a stir-fry. Adding soy sauce to sweet potatoes and yams will give them a more balanced taste. Soaking them in Himalayan salt solution will also do wonders for the flavour of sweet potatoes and yams.
Copyright M-J de Mesterton, 2010

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