Winter Cold Remedies

Hot Chiles, Onions and Ginger are Known to Help Relieve Colds


Gargle with Himalayan Salt and Warm Water 
(Oil Painting of Himalayan Salt Crystals by M-J de Mesterton, ©2007)
Carrots, Onions, Ginger and Peppers Sautéed and Served with Rice: a Cold-Fighting Luncheon Dish
I once cured my husband, who has been malarial since his operations in Africa, of a devastating cold/cough/fever/flu. I fed him sliced ginger in honey a few times a day, cayenne capsules, various herbal tisanes, aspirin and Theraflu. Whenever we get a hint of a tickle in our throats, or wake up with a full-fledged sore throat, we gargle with salt, take Zicam, Airborne in a glass of water,  and eat a lot of ginger. Neither of us has had a cold since that aforementioned worrisome time. A trip to the doctor will do no good for the common cold. We would never dream of plugging up the already-jammed waiting rooms for such a malady, and antibiotics do nothing for viruses. Even Tamiflu only shortens the duration of influenza by a day or so. Here is a well-known trick to ward off a nascent cold: put hydrogen peroxide in the ears. If one is not averse to sugar, keeping a jar full of candied ginger is a good idea. That way, you can pop a piece whenever you feel a bit down. A better way to ingest ginger is to slice it fresh and mix it with honey, another a germ-killer. Is ginger a panacea? No, but it certainly enhances general health, as do hot peppers, because they create an environment in which viruses seldom thrive. Raw garlic works, you say? It may make you well, but it will make your friends sick. Remember to have salt, honey, ginger, hydrogen peroxide and red pepper in the pantry during this winter to stuff a cold or influenza infection in its beginning stages, so that you can get well sooner.
©M-J de Mesterton, 2006–2013

Click Here to Read M-J’s Main Website, Elegant Survival

Elegant Apple-Ginger Cocktail

Tito’s Handmade Vodka is exceedingly smooth. This cocktail slush is made from Tito’s, ice, apple concentrate or syrup, a slice of Fuji apple, and a slice of ginger, and processed in an electric blender by Oster. Add apple juice if desired. The ingredients for this elegant, health-promoting drink
can be added in amounts that are adjusted to your own taste.
©M-J de Mesterton 2011 

Elegant Apple-Ginger Cocktail

Tito’s Handmade Vodka is exceedingly smooth. This cocktail slush is made from Tito’s, ice, apple concentrate or syrup, a slice of Fuji apple, and a slice of ginger, and processed in an electric blender by Oster. Add apple juice if desired. The ingredients for this elegant, health-promoting drink
can be added in amounts that are adjusted to your own taste.
©M-J de Mesterton 2011 

Protect Yourself from Hospital-Acquired Diseases

 

Ginger for Colds and Flu
Eating Ginger Helps to Kill Cold and Flu Viruses

Last night we called our dear friend Sandra, who regularly visits friends in Seattle’s hospitals. She is a retired nurse in her 70s. She had been to visit a friend of hers in the hospital a few weeks ago, and sensed that there was something being coughed into the air by a patient in the general vicinity. Sandra did what she could to prevent being infected, but when she got home realized that she felt under-the-weather already. The cold that she caught at the hospital has lingered for weeks. We recommended that she take Zicam and raw ginger. We ended our conversation as she left for the store to buy those two things, and Sandra promised to let us know her status very soon–whether these two remedies work. It is best to take these things as as soon as you feel a cold or flu coming on.

This morning, I saw a recent editorial on the People’s Pharmacy entitled, “Be Vigilant to Avoid Harm in the Hospital.” It warns of  a number of bugs and maladies one can be infected with just by visiting the hospital, some of them hard-to-cure and antibiotic-resistant,  and explains precautions to take when being treated there.

©M-J de Mesterton

Anti-Viral Stir-Fry

Originally Posted at 04:10 PM on October 23, 2009

I slow-cooked a mixture of quinoa and basmati rice this morning. To eat with it, I sautéed chile peppers, onions, pineapple, carrots and ginger in a wok primed with coconut oil. Onions, chiles, ginger and coconut oil are known to inhibit viral infections.
~~M-J 
Anti-Viral Foods are Important this Holiday Season

Anti-Viral Stir-Fry

Originally Posted at 04:10 PM on October 23, 2009

I slow-cooked a mixture of quinoa and basmati rice this morning. To eat with it, I sautéed chile peppers, onions, pineapple, carrots and ginger in a wok primed with coconut oil. Onions, chiles, ginger and coconut oil are known to inhibit viral infections.
~~M-J 
Anti-Viral Foods are Important this Holiday Season

How to Stuff a Cold


I once cured my husband, who has been malarial since his operations in Africa, of a devastating cold/cough/fever/flu. I fed him sliced ginger in honey a few times a day, cayenne capsules, various herbal tisanes, aspirin and Theraflu. Whenever we get a hint of a tickle in our throats, or wake up with a full-fledged sore throat, we gargle with salt, take Zicam, Airborne in a glass of water,  and eat a lot of ginger. Neither of us has had a cold since that aforementioned worrisome time. A trip to the doctor will do no good for the common cold. We would never dream of plugging up the already-jammed waiting rooms for such a malady, and antibiotics do nothing for viruses. Even Tamiflu only shortens the duration of influenza by a day or so. Here is a well-known trick to ward off a nascent cold: put hydrogen peroxide in the ears. If one is not averse to sugar, keeping a jar full of candied ginger is a good idea. That way, you can pop a piece whenever you feel a bit down. A better way to ingest ginger is to slice it fresh and mix it with honey, another a germ-killer. Is ginger a panacea? No, but it certainly enhances general health, as do hot peppers, because they create an environment in which viruses seldom thrive. Raw garlic works, you say? It may make you well, but it will make your friends sick. Remember to have salt, honey, ginger, hydrogen peroxide and red pepper in the pantry during this winter to stuff a cold or influenza infection in its beginning stages, so that you can get well sooner.

©M-J de Mesterton

How to Stuff a Cold


I once cured my husband, who has been malarial since his operations in Africa, of a devastating cold/cough/fever/flu. I fed him sliced ginger in honey a few times a day, cayenne capsules, various herbal tisanes, aspirin and Theraflu. Whenever we get a hint of a tickle in our throats, or wake up with a full-fledged sore throat, we gargle with salt, take Zicam, Airborne in a glass of water,  and eat a lot of ginger. Neither of us has had a cold since that aforementioned worrisome time. A trip to the doctor will do no good for the common cold. We would never dream of plugging up the already-jammed waiting rooms for such a malady, and antibiotics do nothing for viruses. Even Tamiflu only shortens the duration of influenza by a day or so. Here is a well-known trick to ward off a nascent cold: put hydrogen peroxide in the ears. If one is not averse to sugar, keeping a jar full of candied ginger is a good idea. That way, you can pop a piece whenever you feel a bit down. A better way to ingest ginger is to slice it fresh and mix it with honey, another a germ-killer. Is ginger a panacea? No, but it certainly enhances general health, as do hot peppers, because they create an environment in which viruses seldom thrive. Raw garlic works, you say? It may make you well, but it will make your friends sick. Remember to have salt, honey, ginger, hydrogen peroxide and red pepper in the pantry during this winter to stuff a cold or influenza infection in its beginning stages, so that you can get well sooner.

©M-J de Mesterton

Health-Enhancing Blueberries

M-J de Mesterton Still Life with Fruit Smoothie, Copyright 2009
M-J de Mesterton: Still Life with Fruit Smoothie, Copyright 2008

Blueberries contain vitamins A and C, zinc, potassium, iron, calcium and magnesium, are high in fiber and low in calories. The USDA Human Nutrition Center (HNRCA) has ranked blueberries at the very top of antioxidant activity within a range of forty-one fruits and vegetables.

Blueberries contain natural health-enhancers, including vitamin C,  vitamin A, zinc, potassium, iron, calcium and magnesium. They also have many antioxidant properties, and help in the prevention of:

  • Urinary-tract infections
  • Cancer
  • Metabolic Syndrome
  • Diabetes
  • Age-related brain disorders
  • Brain-damage from ischemia and strokes

Blueberries have recently acquired a reputation for enhancing one’s cardiovascular health, and their antioxidants naturally help in the prevention of cancer. Recent research has added to the blueberry’s list of powerful properties.

Metabolic syndrome, or pre-diabetes, is exhibited in those with a particular combination of health anomalies,  including larger-than-normal  amounts of abdominal fat, elevated blood-sugar, high blood pressure, and high triglycerides. Together, those conditions are likely to cause diabetes, cardiovascular disease, heart attacks, and strokes.

Laboratory-rats that for 90 days consumed blueberry-enriched powder as two percent of their diet had less abdominal fat, lower triglycerides, lower cholesterol, and improved fasting glucose and insulin sensitivity than the control-group, who had no blueberry component in their diets.

Blueberry ingestion was determined to have a positive affect on specific genes related to fat-burning and fat-storage.  Where muscle tissue is concerned,  alterations in genes related to glucose-uptake were discovered to have been caused by the intake of blueberries.

Research also indicated that “metabolic syndrome” is  caused not only by abdominal fat, as previously believed by the medical industry, but by insulin resistance in one’s skeletal muscle system, an anomaly which alters energy-storage and causes metabolic syndrome.

Eating blueberries can help to prevent insulin-resistance, lower the related belly-fat, reduce cholesterol levels, and its numerous antioxidants can help to stave-off age-related brain disorders.

Blueberries  contain an antioxidant compound called pterostilbene, a compound similar to resveratrol, which has been found to reduce cholesterol as well as dangerous prescription drugs.

Just as dried cherries do, blueberries, when added to ground beef before cooking, help reduce the formation of  cancer-causing heterocyclic amines (HCA).

In Europe, the bilberry has most of the same properties as the blueberry. One of the many things they have in common is anthocyanin, the substance that makes them blue, which is beneficial to the cardiovascular system and is believed to lower blood-pressure. Bilberries have been used to enhance eyesight since World War 11, when pilots who ate bilberry jam attributed their improved night-vision to the tiny fruit. Bilberries are also said to aid in relief of varicose veins and gum-disease as they promote healthy circulation. Caution must be taken with bilberries by those who are taking blood-thinnning drugs, as they are a natural blood-thinner.

Blueberries can be added to a morning smoothie that you make with yogurt in a blender, together with whatever other fruits you have in stock. Frozen blueberries can be much less expensive than fresh ones, easier to store, and retain most of their antioxidant properties. When used in a smoothie, frozen blueberries make it ice-cold. This preparation makes a health-promoting breakfast, and is delicious as well. Staying well is the best thing you can do in this ailing world.

~~M-J

How to Stuff a Cold

Ginger_and_Ginger_Jar_Japan_by_M-J_de_Mesterton

Photo Copyright M-J de Mesterton 2007

Courtesy of M-J de Mesterton

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