Stir-Fried Vegetables and Brown Rice

Stir-Fried_Vegetables_Copyright_M-J_de_Mesterton_Elegant_Cook
Celery, onions, red capsicums and zucchini are sliced and stir-fried in two spoonfuls of coconut oil. When these vegetables have been slightly browned, pre-cooked brown rice will be added, and the whole lot cooked a bit more.

Stir-Fried_Brown_Rice_Veg_in_Season_Elegant_Cook_M-J_de_Mesterton
Remember stir-fried vegetables and brown rice? Updated with coconut oil, it really is health-promoting dish, loaded as it is with vitamins and fibre.  Combining sautéed vegetables and brown rice is a wonderful way to use your abundant garden vegetables, and constitutes an entire meal.  I like to put a bottle of soy sauce and some Asian-style “red chili oil” on the table for optional seasoning. ©M-J de Mesterton 2017

Stir-Fried_Brown_Rice_Vegetables_Copyright_M-J_de_Mestertron

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Protect Yourself from Hospital-Acquired Diseases

 

Ginger for Colds and Flu
Eating Ginger Helps to Kill Cold and Flu Viruses

Last night we called our dear friend Sandra, who regularly visits friends in Seattle’s hospitals. She is a retired nurse in her 70s. She had been to visit a friend of hers in the hospital a few weeks ago, and sensed that there was something being coughed into the air by a patient in the general vicinity. Sandra did what she could to prevent being infected, but when she got home realized that she felt under-the-weather already. The cold that she caught at the hospital has lingered for weeks. We recommended that she take Zicam and raw ginger. We ended our conversation as she left for the store to buy those two things, and Sandra promised to let us know her status very soon–whether these two remedies work. It is best to take these things as as soon as you feel a cold or flu coming on.

This morning, I saw a recent editorial on the People’s Pharmacy entitled, “Be Vigilant to Avoid Harm in the Hospital.” It warns of  a number of bugs and maladies one can be infected with just by visiting the hospital, some of them hard-to-cure and antibiotic-resistant,  and explains precautions to take when being treated there.

©M-J de Mesterton

M-J’s Elegant Eggs Vienna: 3 Sources of Protein and Choline

M-J's Eggs Vienna First Recipe for Eggs Vienna on the Internet, by M-J de Mesterton 2006

M-J’s Original Eggs Vienna


M-J de Mesterton’s Eggs Vienna Recipe

This Dish Features Three Sources of Choline

An old friend of mine used to make this dish for me in the 1970s. I had published my recipe for the unusual breakfast offering on Elegant Survival in 2006; it was for a long time the only recipe for Eggs Vienna on the internet. I shall reconstruct it here at Elegant Cuisine:

Eggs Vienna for Two

Prepare four slices of streaky American-style bacon until they are crisp. Poach two eggs in two cups of boiling milk, until they are soft. Toast two slices of white bread or English muffins, then butter them. When all three components are ready, place one piece of  toast in each of  two soup-bowls. Place two slices of  bacon on top of each piece of toast, then top that with a poached egg. Pour the remaining hot milk, in which the eggs have been poached, into each bowl.

Eggs, Bacon and Milk are Good Sources of Choline, which, when Ingested by Pregnant Women,  Contributes to the Intelligence of Babies, and for Everyone Else, It Helps to Prevent Heart Disease

Choline on FoodistaCholine

Yams and Sweet Potatoes: Versatile, Health-Promoting Vegetables

Yams and Sweet Potatoes

Eating yams or sweet potatoes every day is believed to be one of the reasons  the people of Okinawa, Japan, have the longest average life expectancy in the world.

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, the yam is “neutral” in nature–somewhere between yin and yang. Its properties can help to tranquilise the mind, preserve youthful skin, nourish the spleen, stomach, kidneys, aid in digestion, and contribute to a feeling of fullness, something that can aid both dieters and poor people.

Yams contain vitamin B6, which can soothe the mind as well as boost immunity. Rich in linoleic acid and fibre, yams not only help to alleviate constipation, but can also reduce cholesterol build-up blood vessels, a process which helps prevent arteriosclerosis and thrombosis.

The yam is rich in protein, vitamins A , E and C, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, iron, magnesium, and potassium. Although its vitamin B1 and B2 content is six and three times higher than that of rice respectively, 100 grams (3.5 ounces) of yams produce only 99 calories, a one-third the amount that rice contains. Because yams are alkaline foods, they can help decrease body fat. Acid foods lead to fat-storage in the human body. Yams and sweet potatoes also contain lycopene, which is believed to help prevent prostate cancer. A hormone-like, anti-inflammatory  compound called dioscin exists in both yams and sweet potatoes, as well as vitamin C and carotenoids.

Sweet potatoes and yams have the same qualities, even though they are from different families, so substituting the root-vegetable known as sweet potato for yams is perfectly acceptable and will yield the same health-results when eaten. If the yam or sweet potato is too sweet for your liking, there are several ways to incorporate them into your diet that will make them seem less so. For example, a well-scrubbed yam may be chopped into matchsticks or slivers, fibrous skin and all, and added to a stir-fry. Adding soy sauce to sweet potatoes and yams will give them a more balanced taste. Soaking them in Himalayan salt solution will also do wonders for the flavour of sweet potatoes and yams.

The shirataki noodle, which contains soya and yam flour, is considered an excellent weight-loss food because it is low in carbohydrates while being high in glucomannan, a high-quality fibre (fiber).

A stir-fried dish of shirataki noodles, yams, onions, ginger, pineapple and peanuts is pictured here in a previous post at Elegant Survival News.

~~M-J de Mesterton, January 2nd 2010

Cholesterol and Fat are Good for You; Statin Drugs Not so Good

Cornish Pasty--Eat Hearty, Lads and Lassies!

M-J’s Book Recommendation, found at Amazon.com

Fat and Cholesterol are GOOD for You! by Uffe Ravnskov


Do you know
…what REALLY causes heart disease?
…that heart patients haven’t eaten more saturated fat than other people and stroke patients have eaten less?
…that diabetics may be cured if they replace carbohydrates with saturated fat?
…that people with low cholesterol become just as atherosclerotic as people with high?
…that high cholesterol is not a risk factor for women or diabetics?
…that high cholesterol is not a risk factor for old people although by far most heart attacks occur after age 65?
…that old people with high cholesterol live longer than old people with low?
…that the lipoproteins protect us against infectious diseases and probably also against cancer? The author is a scientist himself and has published more than 80 papers and letters in the scientific press critical to the cholesterol campaign, for which he has won two international awards. In his new book, which includes updated and simplified sections from his previous one (The Cholesterol Myths), Ravnskov also presents his own idea about the cause of heart disease, an idea that explains all the findings that do not fit with the present view.
Did you know?…that cholesterol is not a deadly poison, but a substance vital to the cells of all mammals?

…that your body produces three to four times more cholesterol than you eat?

…that the internal production increases when you eat only small amounts of cholesterol and decreases when you eat large amounts?

…that heart patients haven’t eaten more saturated fat than other people?

…that stroke patients have eaten less?

…that people with low cholesterol become just as atherosclerotic as people with high?

…that high cholesterol is not a risk factor for women?

…that high cholesterol is not a risk factor for old people although by far most heart attacks occur after age 65?

…that many of the cholesterol-lowering drugs are dan¬gerous to your health and may shorten your life?

…that the cholesterol campaign creates immense prosperity for researchers, doctors, medical journals, drug producers and the food industry?

Read the entire analysis!


Product Details

Author: Uffe Ravnskov

  • Paperback: 244 pages
  • Publisher: GB Publishing (January 26, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 919755538X
  • ISBN-13: 978-9197555388
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.9 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces

M-J’s Winter Health Smoothie

cropped-aeedd-elegant_smoothie_winter_health_copyright_de_mesterton.jpg

Green_Smoothie_M-J_de_Mesterton_Recipes
One half-cup of water, one fourth-cup of lemon juice, one jalapeño or serrano pepper (roasted, pickled or fresh), two stalks of celery, one-half of a cucumber, one tablespoon of thick yoghurt or one half-cup of buttermilk, one teaspoon of apple cider vinegar and one tablespoon of parsley, all whirled in a blender till smooth. Add water if necessary for processing.

big grinCopyright M-J de Mesterton 2009

The Health-Benefits of Cinnamon

Cinnamon aids in the regulation of weight and blood sugar. It is delicious on apples, oatmeal, rice pudding, and in coffee or tea.

Cinnamon is rich in antioxidants, and is sometimes added to a foot-soak or a facial treatment to soften skin.

Tea made with cinnamon sticks can soothe a sore throat.

Cinnamon may help to preserve one’s power of memory.

Turmeric as a Healing Spice, from the Okinawa Program

This 2001 book, The Okinawa Program by Bradley J. Willcox, M.D., D. Craig Willcox, Ph. D., and Makoto Suzuki, M.D., is based upon the 25-year-long Okinawa Centenarian Study. It is one of my favorite diet and health books.

Turmeric has recently garnered respect and much publicity as a medicinal plant from the ginger family. The qualities of turmeric are not news to the famously long-living people of Okinawa, as related on page 149:

Excerpt:

Ucchin, or Turmeric M-J’s pronunciation note: TER-mer-ick

(Curcuma longa, Jiang Huang, Curcuma, Indian saffron, Ukon, Valerian)

Ucchin, commonly known in North America as turmeric,  is one of the Okinawans’ favorite herbs (as it is in India), and claims a multitude of health benefits. It’s known as ukon to the Japanese….

Folkloric Claims

Turmeric is from the ginger family. The stalk of the plant is the part most commonly used in both herbal and traditional medicine, and is the part that provides the distinctive yellow-orange powder that adds flavor and color to curry. It was probably brought to Okinawa centuries ago from India, which had active trade relations with the Ryukyu Kingdom (as Okinawa was formerly known). In Ayurvedic medicine…turmeric is thought to strengthen the immune system, relieve inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, improve digestion, relieve gas, killl parasites and worms, alleviate menstrual problems, dissolve gallstones, and relieve other ailments. The Okinawans are in full accord with these claims, and highly prize their turmeric.

Excerpt, page 150

Turmeric possesses significant antioxidant properties, comparable to that of vitamins E or C, which is probably why it proves powerful against cancer. The American Institute for Cancer Research has reported some degree of inhibition for cancers of the GI tract, including oral, esophageal, stomach, and colon cancers. And, there is further evidence for its effectiveness against breast and skin cancers.

M-J’s Diuretic Smoothie

Green_Smoothie_M-J_de_Mesterton_Recipes
One half-cup of water, one fourth-cup of lemon juice, one jalapeño or other hot pepper (roasted or fresh), two stalks of celery, one-half of a cucumber, one tablespoon of thick yoghurt, and one tablespoon of parsley, all whirled in a blender till smooth. Add water if necessary for processing.

big grinCopyright M-J de Mesterton 2009

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