Turmeric Tea, a Liver Detoxifier

Liver Tonic, Turmeric
Turmeric Tea, as Served on Okinawa

A Possible Weight-Loss Aid and Other Benefits of  Turmeric

In elegant survival, elegant survival health, Elegant Survival Kitchen Essentials, Elegant Survival Living on a Shoestring, Elegant Survival Recommendations, Elegant Survival tactics, Elegant Survival: Stylish Living on a Shoestring, Health, Health Concerns, Health Food on 24/04/2009 at 10:26 am

Researchers have determined that laboratory mice given a diet supplemented with curcumin experience a reduction in the formation of fat-tissue, and a lowered number of blood-vessels that feed fat. Curcumin is the active ingredient and major polyphenol in the bright yellow spice from India known as turmeric.

The growth and expansion of fat-tissues requires new blood vessels, a process known as angiogenesis. In fat-tissue, this process is mediated by the secretion of adipokines, such as leptin, adiponectin, resistin, interleukin-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The researchers first investigated the effect of curcumin in cultured human cells to which adipokines had been added to stimulate angiogenesis. They found that the ability of curcumin to inhibit angiogenesis was partly due to the reduced expression of VEGF. Subsequently, the mice were fed a high-fat diet supplemented with 500 milligrams curcumin per kilogram of food, for three months. Weight-gain was reduced in the mice who were given curcumin. The curcumin-supplemented mice had lower weight and reduced total-body fat. They also had lower liver-weights, and experienced a reduction in VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), indicating reduced risk for angiogenesis.

Also called “curcumin”, turmeric is a mustard-yellow spice from India. Indians use it more for its healing properties than for taste. Turmeric has an innocuous flavor, and adds colour to foods.

In India, turmeric has been revered for its healing properties, and thus is used as a daily dietary supplement.  In the Ayurvedic system of health, turmeric has medicinal properties and is an anti-inflammatory agent to treat a wide variety of conditions, including flatulence, jaundice, menstrual difficulties, bloody urine, hemorrhage, toothache, bruises, chest pain, and colic. Because of its effects on enzymes related to inflammation, turmeric may have the same mode of action as anti-inflammatory drugs, without the side-effects. Curcumin is used for cuts and burns and is known as an antiseptic/antibacterial. It is also used to remedy stomach-ulcers.

The U.S. National Institues of Health has four clinical trials in progress, involving curcumin as a treatment for pancreatic cancer, multiple myeloma, Alzheimer’s, and colorectal cancer. According to a 2005 article in the Wall Street Journal titled, “Common Indian Spice Stirs Hope,” research activity into curcumin, turmeric’s active ingredient, is burgeoning. Two-hundred and fifty-six curcumin-study papers were published in 2005, according to a search of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

 M-J de M., 2009

 

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Green Tea Fights Flu

ARTICLE by The NUTRITION REPORTER, JACK CHALLEM

“Green tea is known to contain antiviral components that prevent influenza infection,” wrote Hiroshi Yamada, MD, PhD, of the University of Shizuoka, Japan.
Yamada and his colleagues analyzed questionnaires from 2,050 students, ages six to 13 years, in elementary schools in Kikugawa City. The questionnaires included information about their consumption of green tea.

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Winter Cold Remedies

Hot Chiles, Onions and Ginger are Known to Help Relieve Colds


Gargle with Himalayan Salt and Warm Water 
(Oil Painting of Himalayan Salt Crystals by M-J de Mesterton, ©2007)
Carrots, Onions, Ginger and Peppers Sautéed and Served with Rice: a Cold-Fighting Luncheon Dish
I once cured my husband, who has been malarial since his operations in Africa, of a devastating cold/cough/fever/flu. I fed him sliced ginger in honey a few times a day, cayenne capsules, various herbal tisanes, aspirin and Theraflu. Whenever we get a hint of a tickle in our throats, or wake up with a full-fledged sore throat, we gargle with salt, take Zicam, Airborne in a glass of water,  and eat a lot of ginger. Neither of us has had a cold since that aforementioned worrisome time. A trip to the doctor will do no good for the common cold. We would never dream of plugging up the already-jammed waiting rooms for such a malady, and antibiotics do nothing for viruses. Even Tamiflu only shortens the duration of influenza by a day or so. Here is a well-known trick to ward off a nascent cold: put hydrogen peroxide in the ears. If one is not averse to sugar, keeping a jar full of candied ginger is a good idea. That way, you can pop a piece whenever you feel a bit down. A better way to ingest ginger is to slice it fresh and mix it with honey, another a germ-killer. Is ginger a panacea? No, but it certainly enhances general health, as do hot peppers, because they create an environment in which viruses seldom thrive. Raw garlic works, you say? It may make you well, but it will make your friends sick. Remember to have salt, honey, ginger, hydrogen peroxide and red pepper in the pantry during this winter to stuff a cold or influenza infection in its beginning stages, so that you can get well sooner.
©M-J de Mesterton, 2006–2013

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