Health-Promoting Honey

Inside and Out, Honey Promotes Good Health

Using Honey to Promote Good Health

Honey helps to kill viruses and bacterial infections, especially when mixed and eaten with raw, minced ginger.
Honey boosts energy, reduces fatigue, stimulates mental alertness; honey strengthens immunity by providing minerals, vitamins, and anti-oxidants.
Help to preserve your eyesight by eating a spoonful of honey every day.
Honey alleviates sore throats, and is used as a natural replacement for cough syrup.
Honey helps to prevent heart disease by improving blood flow; honey protects your capillaries.
Reduce anxiety by using honey as a mild sedative; it promotes calmness and restful sleep.
Honey helps to adjust the human body’s alkalinity, thereby mitigating general interior inflammation.
Anti-cancer properties in honey inhibit the formation of tumors.
Honey helps to relieve indigestion and acid reflux; honey is instrumental in healing peptic ulcers.
Ingesting honey promotes the expulsion of parasites from the liver and colon.
Honey helps to control blood pressure.
Honey improves and promotes proper digestion with its natural enzymes.
Build immunity to hay fever by mixing honey and bee pollen; ingest this potion daily in advance of and during allergy-season.
Honey helps to quench thirst and alleviate heat-stroke.
Mitigate the effects of toxins in the human body by using honey in green tea.
Honey speeds metabolism, thereby stimulating weight-loss.
Drink a mixture of honey, lemon and warm water in the morning for a beneficial interior cleanse.
Honey aids the healing of diabetic ulcers with daily topical applications.
Relieve hangovers by eating honey in tea or mixed with raw ginger
Honey acts as a mild laxative; mixing it in a cup of hot tea enhances its efficacy .
Honey can reduce asthma symptoms when mixed with pepper and ginger.
Alleviate symptoms of hay fever by chewing on honeycomb.
Honey, a natural antibacterial, is used to cleanse wounds; rubbing it regularly on wounds promotes and accelerates healing.
Applying honey to healing wounds aids in preventing scars.
Sooth burns, disinfect wounds, reduce inflammation, and promote skin-healing with honey.
Scrub with honey to exfoliate facial skin and reduce wrinkles; apply lightly to soften dry, rough skin elsewhere.
Protect hair from split ends by using honey as a conditioner; adding honey to rinse-water promotes shine.
Honey makes a skin-friendly lip balm and is beneficial as a component of herbal cleansing-washes.
Helps to kill acne-causing bacteria and can reduce scarring, so rub some honey on acne at night to help heal while you sleep.
Adding a bit of honey softens hard bath-water.
Anti-fungal properties in honey help to resolve internal yeast-infections and athlete’s foot.
Honey protects internally and externally against pathogens such as Staphylococcus Aureus, Pseudomonas Aeruginosa and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus or “MRSA”.

Inspired by an article in Natural News, with thanks to Mike Adams, the Health Ranger

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M-J’s Elegant Eggs Vienna: 3 Sources of Protein and Choline

M-J's Eggs Vienna First Recipe for Eggs Vienna on the Internet, by M-J de Mesterton 2006

M-J’s Original Eggs Vienna

 

M-J de Mesterton’s Eggs Vienna Recipe

This Dish Features Three Sources of Choline

An old friend of mine used to make this dish for me in the 1970s. I had published my recipe for the unusual breakfast offering on Elegant Survival in 2006; it was for a long time the only recipe for Eggs Vienna on the internet. I shall reconstruct it here at Elegant Cuisine:

Eggs Vienna for Two

Prepare four slices of streaky American-style bacon until they are crisp. Poach two eggs in two cups of boiling milk, until they are soft. Toast two slices of white bread or English muffins, then butter them. When all three components are ready, place one piece of  toast in each of  two soup-bowls. Place two slices of  bacon on top of each piece of toast, then top that with a poached egg. Pour the remaining hot milk, in which the eggs have been poached, into each bowl. ©M-J de Mesterton 2006

Eggs, Bacon and Milk are Good Sources of Choline, which, when Ingested by Pregnant Women,  Contributes to the Intelligence of Babies, and for Everyone Else, It Helps to Prevent Heart Disease

 

Yams and Sweet Potatoes: Versatile, Health-Promoting Vegetables

Yams and Sweet Potatoes

Eating yams or sweet potatoes every day is believed to be one of the reasons  the people of Okinawa, Japan, have the longest average life expectancy in the world.

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, the yam is “neutral” in nature–somewhere between yin and yang. Its properties can help to tranquilise the mind, preserve youthful skin, nourish the spleen, stomach, kidneys, aid in digestion, and contribute to a feeling of fullness, something that can aid both dieters and poor people.

Yams contain vitamin B6, which can soothe the mind as well as boost immunity. Rich in linoleic acid and fibre, yams not only help to alleviate constipation, but can also reduce cholesterol build-up blood vessels, a process which helps prevent arteriosclerosis and thrombosis.

The yam is rich in protein, vitamins A , E and C, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, iron, magnesium, and potassium. Although its vitamin B1 and B2 content is six and three times higher than that of rice respectively, 100 grams (3.5 ounces) of yams produce only 99 calories, a one-third the amount that rice contains. Because yams are alkaline foods, they can help decrease body fat. Acid foods lead to fat-storage in the human body. Yams and sweet potatoes also contain lycopene, which is believed to help prevent prostate cancer. A hormone-like, anti-inflammatory  compound called dioscin exists in both yams and sweet potatoes, as well as vitamin C and carotenoids.

Sweet potatoes and yams have the same qualities, even though they are from different families, so substituting the root-vegetable known as sweet potato for yams is perfectly acceptable and will yield the same health-results when eaten. If the yam or sweet potato is too sweet for your liking, there are several ways to incorporate them into your diet that will make them seem less so. For example, a well-scrubbed yam may be chopped into matchsticks or slivers, fibrous skin and all, and added to a stir-fry. Adding soy sauce to sweet potatoes and yams will give them a more balanced taste. Soaking them in Himalayan salt solution will also do wonders for the flavour of sweet potatoes and yams.

The shirataki noodle, which contains soya and yam flour, is considered an excellent weight-loss food because it is low in carbohydrates while being high in glucomannan, a high-quality fibre (fiber).

A stir-fried dish of shirataki noodles, yams, onions, ginger, pineapple and peanuts is pictured here in a previous post at Elegant Survival News.

~~M-J de Mesterton, January 2nd 2010