Proper Ollie: Minding Our Manners

Elegant Manners

Tuesday, March 25, 2008

Proper Ollie: Manners in Minutes

Sculpture by J.Seward Johnson  (Photo Copyright M-J de Mesterton)

Together with standards of dress, manners have taken a nose-dive. These short videos featuring Proper Ollie are amusing, but so true. Don’t let the person being laughed at or hit with a brickbat be you!

Particularly well-done is this Table Manners video by Proper Ollie. 

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Hatred Makes You Ugly

By M-J de Mesterton

Have you ever noticed that the more resentful and jealous a woman is, the more wrinkles she has? The most important age-preventing measure for your face is being a member of the Clear Conscience Club–you know, the one whose members get a good night’s sleep. When people carry around the burdens of hatred and envy, resentments and greed, these destructive inner elements inevitably manifest themselves on their faces. Here is a quote from an interview by Linda Holmes with elegant, ageless singer Darlene Love, whose work in the 1960s with music innovator Phil Spector catapulted her to fame and made her into the exploited victim of a megalomaniac who was ethically-challenged, and for whom loyalty was a foreign concept:

“I have no reason to hate him,” she says, “and I never did, because I always found that hate makes you ugly. Makes you have wrinkles. Which I don’t have.” Here, she laughed. “But you know what? That has a whole lot to do with your insides. When you hate people, it not only makes you hate that person, it gives that vibe off for everything around you. I really do believe that. So I really did try hard not to dislike him and always be the good guy, and say what I say about him and nothing bad. ‘Cause it doesn’t help.”

 

 

Smooth-Talkers

 

Gals Have Got to Get Rid of the Gravel in Their Gullets

L'Homme Elégant, by Edouard Touraine, 1912

M-J de Mesterton’s New Page on Elegant Speech: Smooth-Talkers

Editorial by M-J de Mesterton: Gals are Growling: What Gives?

Posted by M-J de Mesterton on Elegant Survival,  September 28, 2010 at 4:49 PM

Every time I am exposed to radio or television–and that isn’t often–I am puzzled by a new trend in women’s speech. If one has never ceased monitoring popular U.S. broadcasting outlets, entertainment and media advertising, it may not be apparent to them.  Being in the habit of avoiding American pop-culture–and only occasionally witnessing the stuff–like Rip van Winkle, I have suddenly awakened in a world that has changed drastically. Women, especially those under fifty, are chirping their sentences like Valley Girls, and culminating them in a very fatigued, strained-sounding growl. This guttural sound is not feminine, and I don’t know whence its inspiration, nor whom they are attempting to emulate. Listening to a paragraph spoken by one of these hapless victims of fashion is like travelling ten miles of bad gravel-road.

There is a better way to speak, which simply involves modulating one’s voice in a soft tone all the way to the end of each sentence, leaving that grating growl to the dogs and to your male counterparts. Men really don’t think it’s sexy. I’ve heard gents describe this new manner of female-speaking in the most unflattering of terms. For examples of attractive feminine speech, old movies are instructive. Even Lauren Bacall didn’t do the gritty, guttural growl. This new way of talking must have been in fashion for quite some time while I “slept,” because it takes a concerted effort to put into effect–in fact, some of us find it impossible to imitate. Maintaining a pleasant and natural tone, terminating your phrases with a definite stop instead of an audible question-mark, is a winning habit. Dragging the last syllable out longer than those in the rest of the sentence is bad diction, and ought to be avoided. I don’t like to preach–leave that to other writers. That said, I occasionally feel the need to make a suggestion. Mocking some pop-tart who is piled-out on coke, booze and cigarettes is a losing proposition in any facet of your life, so it would be good for you girls to get the gravel out of your gullets, and start sounding like real women again!

©M-J de Mesterton 2010


Author and Painter, M-J de Mesterton

Gals are Growling: What Gives?

Gals are Growling: What Gives?

An Editorial by M-J de Mesterton
Posted on September 28, 2010 at 4:49 PM

Every time I am exposed to radio or television–and that isn’t often–I am puzzled by a new trend in women’s speech. If one has never ceased monitoring popular U.S. broadcasting outlets, entertainment and media advertising, it may not be apparent to them.  Being in the habit of avoiding American pop-culture–and only occasionally witnessing the stuff–like Rip van Winkle, I have suddenly awakened in a world that has changed drastically. Women, especially those under fifty, are chirping their sentences like Valley Girls, and culminating them in a very fatigued, strained-sounding growl. This guttural sound is not feminine, and I don’t know whence its inspiration, nor whom they are attempting to emulate. Listening to a paragraph spoken by one of these hapless victims of fashion is like travelling ten miles of bad gravel-road.
There is a better way to speak, which simply involves modulating one’s voice in a soft tone all the way to the end of each sentence, leaving that grating growl to the dogs and to your male counterparts. Men really don’t think it’s sexy. I’ve heard gents describe this new manner of female-speaking in the most unflattering of terms. For examples of attractive feminine speech, old movies are instructive. Even Lauren Bacall didn’t do the gritty, guttural growl. This new way of talking must have been in fashion for quite some time while I “slept,” because it takes a concerted effort to put into effect–in fact, some of us find it impossible to imitate. Maintaining a pleasant and natural tone, terminating your phrases with a definite stop instead of an audible question-mark, is a winning habit. I don’t like to preach–leave that to other writers. That said, I occasionally feel the need to make a suggestion. Mocking some pop-tart who is piled-out on coke, booze and cigarettes is a losing proposition in any facet of your life, so it would be good for you girls to get the gravel out of your gullets, and start sounding like real women again!

©M-J de Mesterton 2010

Gals are Growling: What Gives?

Gals are Growling: What Gives?

An Editorial by M-J de Mesterton
Posted on September 28, 2010 at 4:49 PM

Every time I am exposed to radio or television–and that isn’t often–I am puzzled by a new trend in women’s speech. If one has never ceased monitoring popular U.S. broadcasting outlets, entertainment and media advertising, it may not be apparent to them.  Being in the habit of avoiding American pop-culture–and only occasionally witnessing the stuff–like Rip van Winkle, I have suddenly awakened in a world that has changed drastically. Women, especially those under fifty, are chirping their sentences like Valley Girls, and culminating them in a very fatigued, strained-sounding growl. This guttural sound is not feminine, and I don’t know whence its inspiration, nor whom they are attempting to emulate. Listening to a paragraph spoken by one of these hapless victims of fashion is like travelling ten miles of bad gravel-road.
There is a better way to speak, which simply involves modulating one’s voice in a soft tone all the way to the end of each sentence, leaving that grating growl to the dogs and to your male counterparts. Men really don’t think it’s sexy. I’ve heard gents describe this new manner of female-speaking in the most unflattering of terms. For examples of attractive feminine speech, old movies are instructive. Even Lauren Bacall didn’t do the gritty, guttural growl. This new way of talking must have been in fashion for quite some time while I “slept,” because it takes a concerted effort to put into effect–in fact, some of us find it impossible to imitate. Maintaining a pleasant and natural tone, terminating your phrases with a definite stop instead of an audible question-mark, is a winning habit. I don’t like to preach–leave that to other writers. That said, I occasionally feel the need to make a suggestion. Mocking some pop-tart who is piled-out on coke, booze and cigarettes is a losing proposition in any facet of your life, so it would be good for you girls to get the gravel out of your gullets, and start sounding like real women again!

©M-J de Mesterton 2010

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