Waffles_Peanut_Gluten-Free_ElegantCook.net

 

Waffle_Panini_Copyright_ElegantCook.net 1-28-2016 1-57-40 PM

Above: M-J’s High-Protein Waffles are Sliced Thin and Filled with Ham, Cheese, and Dijon-Laced Mayonnaise for Low-Carb Panini (Grilled Sandwiches)

M-J’s Gluten-Free Peanut Flour Waffles

One egg

1/2 cup of buttermilk

1 1/2 cup of water

1 cup of peanut flour*

1 teaspoon of baking soda

1/2 teaspoon of salt

1 tablespoon of melted butter

1 teaspoon of brown sugar (optional; this bit of sucrose helps the waffles to caramelize)

1 tablespoon of lemon juice (optional, but it does add to the leavening)

1 teaspoon of vanilla (optional)

Approximately 5 drops or 1/4 cup of of sucralose sweetener (optional)

If your batter is too thick, add more water or milk. If you think it’s too thin, add a bit more peanut flour.

Brush a waffle iron with butter to prepare its surfaces. Heat your waffle iron, and be careful to add just enough batter to it for each waffle–I find that stopping short of the edges by an eighth of an inch will keep the batter from overflowing once the iron is closed. These waffles take approximately six minutes to bake. You can check on them by opening the waffle iron after four minutes.  For a savoury experience, these waffles are good with bacon and sour cream, and with chicken or roast beef as well.  Of course, these waffles are excellent with strawberries and whipped cream, or dusted with confectioners’ sugar.

©M-J de Mesterton 2016

Peanut_Protein_Waffles_Copyright_M-J_de_Mesterton 1-22-2016 11-14-39 AM

Waffle-Wrappping_Copyright_M-J_de_Mesterton

Wrapping the Waffles in Layers with Waxed Paper

Waffle-Wrapping_Stack_Copyright_ElegantCook.net

Waffles_Wrapped_Copyright_M-J_ElegantCook.net 1-22-2016 3-20-31 PM.net

M-J’s Gluten-Free, Peanut Flour Waffles are Ready for the Freezer

*I use Protein Plus Peanut Powder. Here is their proprietary description:

Peanut flour is a dry powder formed after the partial extraction of oil from the roasted peanut seed. It is used to add flavor and protein to processed baked goods, nutrition bars and snacks, as well as to marinades, sauces and dressings. Worldwide, peanut flours have been limited to use by industrial food processors as a major food ingredient. While peanuts are about 25% protein, peanut flour is about 50% protein. That’s because the process of mechanically removing fatty oil from roasted peanuts enriches the levels of the remaining peanut components. The resulting flour is naturally low in fat, high in protein and relatively low in carbohydrates.

Protein Plus roasted peanut flour provides a healthful, lower-fat, and gluten free boost to a variety of foods. It is a great thickener for soups, a flavorful and aromatic ingredient for breads and pastries, as well as a creative coating for meats, fish, and other dishes. Peanut flour is a good source of Vitamin E, Folate, Fiber, Niacin, Magnesium, and Phosphorus.

Substitute at least 30% of your plain or self-rising wheat flour for peanut flour in any of your favorite recipes. Peanut flour is not self-rising and will need a rising agent added if called for in your recipe. When baking with peanut flour, you may want to add an extra egg or other moistening agent to prevent dryness.

Sugar-Free Jam and Preserves by Smucker’s

Sugar-free preserves and jam by Smucker’s lets diabetics enjoy a little fruit spread with their breakfast or toast and tea. The jars are elegant, with blue-and-white gingham lids, reminiscent of those red-and-white ones on France’s Bonne Maman jars.
©M-J de Mesterton

Coconut Milk

 Coconut Cake, Coconut Cream Pie, Coconut Milk, Full-Fat Coconut Milk, Lemon-Coconut Pudding, Low-Carb Dessert, Low-Carb Diet, Low-Carb Sweets, Low-Carbohydrate Diet, Thai Chicken, Thai Kitchen

Yams and Sweet Potatoes: Versatile, Health-Promoting Vegetables

Yams and Sweet Potatoes

Eating yams or sweet potatoes every day is believed to be one of the reasons  the people of Okinawa, Japan, have the longest average life expectancy in the world.

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, the yam is “neutral” in nature–somewhere between yin and yang. Its properties can help to tranquilise the mind, preserve youthful skin, nourish the spleen, stomach, kidneys, aid in digestion, and contribute to a feeling of fullness, something that can aid both dieters and poor people.

Yams contain vitamin B6, which can soothe the mind as well as boost immunity. Rich in linoleic acid and fibre, yams not only help to alleviate constipation, but can also reduce cholesterol build-up blood vessels, a process which helps prevent arteriosclerosis and thrombosis.

The yam is rich in protein, vitamins A , E and C, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, iron, magnesium, and potassium. Although its vitamin B1 and B2 content is six and three times higher than that of rice respectively, 100 grams (3.5 ounces) of yams produce only 99 calories, a one-third the amount that rice contains. Because yams are alkaline foods, they can help decrease body fat. Acid foods lead to fat-storage in the human body. Yams and sweet potatoes also contain lycopene, which is believed to help prevent prostate cancer. A hormone-like, anti-inflammatory  compound called dioscin exists in both yams and sweet potatoes, as well as vitamin C and carotenoids.

Sweet potatoes and yams have the same qualities, even though they are from different families, so substituting the root-vegetable known as sweet potato for yams is perfectly acceptable and will yield the same health-results when eaten. If the yam or sweet potato is too sweet for your liking, there are several ways to incorporate them into your diet that will make them seem less so. For example, a well-scrubbed yam may be chopped into matchsticks or slivers, fibrous skin and all, and added to a stir-fry. Adding soy sauce to sweet potatoes and yams will give them a more balanced taste. Soaking them in Himalayan salt solution will also do wonders for the flavour of sweet potatoes and yams.

The shirataki noodle, which contains soya and yam flour, is considered an excellent weight-loss food because it is low in carbohydrates while being high in glucomannan, a high-quality fibre (fiber).

A stir-fried dish of shirataki noodles, yams, onions, ginger, pineapple and peanuts is pictured here in a previous post at Elegant Survival News.

~~M-J de Mesterton, January 2nd 2010

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑