Elegant Dressing for Evening

painter_m-j_de_mesterton_february_2017

Above: a proper evening gown, full-length and low-cut at the bodice; this dress is more appropriate for an evening with dinner and dancing than for cocktail parties. (See below.)

Below: “Your Editor”, Painter M-J de Mesterton wears a lacy, cotton-lined dress that can be worn at afternoon tea, or at cocktails/drinks parties year-round. Also, it is suitable for less formal dinners and nightclubs. Long sleeves that leave space for bracelets make this knee-length gown very elegant, and the round neckline accommodates big pearls. Amazon.com has similar dresses for as little as 39.00. Blue suede shoes with comfortable three-inch wedge-heels are by Clarks.

painter_melodie-jeanne_de_mesterton_elegant_evening_dress_2017

M-J de Mesterton’s Pink Lemonade Chicken

M-J’s Pink Lemonade Chicken

I invented this dish for a dinner party guest, a French teacher who was pregnant. She loved it. Other guests did as well, so I have made my Pink Lemonade Chicken for many buffet dinners. Now, I am inspired by my dear nieces and nephews who are expecting babies soon, so I am publishing this recipe again. The ingredients are simple and few, and you may adjust the amounts according to taste.

Ingredients:
Four-to-six pounds of boneless, skinless chicken breasts
One 16-ounce can of frozen pink lemonade
One tablespoon of cornstarch
Salt or celery salt to-taste
Water, two or three cups

Poach chicken breasts in a mixture composed of 2/3 of a 16-ounce can of frozen pink lemonade juice and two or three cups of water.
When it is thawed, the pink lemonade turns to thick syrup. One large can will be sufficient for four-to-six pounds of chicken. Reserve a third of the can for a final sauce.

Cover the boneless, skinless chicken breasts and simmer slowly in the pink lemonade for an hour or more. You may add salt or celery salt, but remember, this dish is created for those with delicate stomachs, so please don’t add garlic or onion flavorings. The liquid will reduce and the whole pieces of chicken should become lightly browned. Remove from heat and place on top of two sheets of waxed paper to protect your cutting board. When the chicken breasts are cool, slice them into medallions–see my example in the photo below–with a very sharp knife. The liquid left-over in the poaching pan will be used to make a sauce.

Elegant Chicken Dish: Original Recipe by M-J de Mesterton
M-J’s Medallions of Chicken

Sauce for Pink Lemonade Chicken

Into the pan, pour 3/4 cup of water and a teaspoon of cornstarch, which has been mixed with a tablespoon of water. Add the 1/3 can of remaining pink lemonade syrup. Cook till it becomes a sauce. Pour some of it on the base of your serving dish. Arrange the slices of chicken in a circular fashion. When you have finished arranging the chicken slices, drizzle the rest of the pink lemonade sauce over them.

Recipe Copyright M-J de Mesterton 2000

M-J in Elegant Holiday Clothing

An elegant white cotton blouse is worn with an ankle-length green velvet skirt, topped with a purple-black-and-white pashmina and accompanied by purple stockings  and black suede pumps. This ensemble is right for daytime and evening wear during the winter holidays.


M-J de Mesterton, Christmas 2010
©Elegant Survival

M-J in Elegant Holiday Clothing

An elegant white cotton blouse is worn with an ankle-length green velvet skirt, topped with a purple-black-and-white pashmina and accompanied by purple stockings  and black suede pumps. This ensemble is right for daytime and evening wear during the winter holidays.


M-J de Mesterton, Christmas 2010
©Elegant Survival

Gardening with Little Water: "Xeriscaping" (Trademark of Denver Water)

Many people in the broadcasting and gardening industries mispronounce this neologism as “zeroscaping.”
In Greek, “xeri” means “dry.”
My own example of “xeriscaping” appears above in the photograph. Rocks collected from the surrounding area enhance the early spring plants.
©M-J de Mesterton 2010

Gardening with Little Water: "Xeriscaping" (Trademark of Denver Water)

Many people in the broadcasting and gardening industries mispronounce this neologism as “zeroscaping.”
In Greek, “xeri” means “dry.”
My own example of “xeriscaping” appears above in the photograph. Rocks collected from the surrounding area enhance the early spring plants.
©M-J de Mesterton 2010

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