Survival Diet Dish: Buckwheat Pancakes

Survival Foods: Buckwheat Pancakes, Brown Rice Syrup Optional
A Strengthening, Easy-to-Store Grain: Buckwheat

Brown Rice Syrup, the Perfect Thing with Organic Buckwheat Pancakes, and Macrobiotically Correct
Brown Rice Syrup: You Will Be Surprised at Its Taste, and Pleased with Its Minimal Effect upon Blood-Sugar

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An Essential Elegant Survival Food: Sprouts

Sprouting Wheat, Beans and Seeds

 Grow your own tiny, highly nutritious vegetables in a few days, anywhere.

Put into glass storage jars, or plastic tote-bins, a year’s supply of alfalfa seeds, mustard seeds, wheat berries (whole wheat kernels) and the beans of your choice. The best ones for sprouting are pinto beans, adzuki beans, small red beans, mung beans, peas, lentils, and any small red or white kidney beans. The smaller the bean, the better crop of sprouts you will have. You are certainly able to sprout large kidney beans, but they may sour faster once sprouted.

Use sterile glass jars with relatively wide mouths, and some nylon, cheesecloth, or plastic window screen material (it’s soft and comes on a roll, available at big hardware stores) attached to their rims with rubber bands. Put a half-inch or so of little beans or alfalfa seeds at the bottom of a jar, and add clean water up to half-jar full. Soak the beans or seeds overnight. The next morning, drain the jar through the porous material attached to the rim. Rinse seeds or beans with water through the top of the jar, no need to remove straining material; drain well, and set in a place with little light. Rinse again in the evening. Repeat this process daily, and on the third or fourth day, you’ll have sprouts.

If you would then like to enhance the sprouts with a little chlorophyll, or green leaves, set the jars on a windowsill for a day.

There’s a variety of ways to prepare and eat sprouts. One is in salads, another is in sandwiches. I like to put them on whole-grain bread that has been spread with labneh, or strained, thickened yogurt.

Some people grind up sprouts and cook them into meatless spaghetti sauce. Sprouts can be baked into breads, as well.

Sprouts are the perfect survival food, if one has the little bit of water required to soak and rinse the seeds or beans. Seeds and beans are easy to store in glass jugs or plastic bulk-bins. They have longevity, just as you will if you treat yourself right.

~~Copyright M-J de Mesterton, 2008



Click Here to Read M-J’s Main Website, Elegant Survival

Make Your Own Sprouts


Sprouting Wheat, Beans and Seeds
 Grow your own tiny, highly nutritious vegetables in a few days, anywhere.
Put into glass storage jars, or plastic tote-bins, a year’s supply of alfalfa seeds, mustard seeds, wheat berries (whole wheat kernels) and the beans of your choice. The best ones for sprouting are pinto beans, adzuki beans, small red beans, mung beans, peas, lentils, and any small red or white kidney beans. The smaller the bean, the better crop of sprouts you will have. You are certainly able to sprout large kidney beans, but they may sour faster once sprouted. Use sterile glass jars with relatively wide mouths, and some nylon, cheesecloth, or plastic window screen material (it’s soft and comes on a roll, available at big hardware stores) attached to their rims with rubber bands. Put a half-inch or so of little beans or alfalfa seeds at the bottom of a jar, and add clean water up to half-jar full. Soak the beans or seeds overnight. The next morning, drain the jar through the porous material attached to the rim. Rinse seeds or beans with water through the top of the jar, no need to remove straining material; drain well, and set in a place with little light. Rinse again in the evening. Repeat this process daily, and on the third or fourth day, you’ll have sprouts.
If you would then like to enhance the sprouts with a little chlorophyll, or green leaves, set the jars on a windowsill for a day.
There’s a variety of ways to prepare and eat sprouts. One is in salads, another is in sandwiches. I like to put them on whole-grain bread that has been spread with labneh, or strained, thickened yogurt.
Some people grind up sprouts and cook them into meatless spaghetti sauce. Sprouts can be baked into breads, as well.
Sprouts are the perfect survival food, if one has the little bit of water required to soak and rinse the seeds or beans. Seeds and beans are easy to store in glass jugs or plastic bulk-bins. They have longevity, just as you will if you treat yourself right.
~~Copyright M-J de Mesterton, 2008

 Click Here to Read M-J’s Main Website, Elegant Survival

It’s Time to Make Granola and Muesli

In anticipation of a food shortage or an absence of electricity, I made muesli (“granola”) today. 
Some of the Ingredients for M-J’s Tropical Muesli
To Be Continued….

It appears that Blogger is having a malfunction. I haven’t been able to consistently upload whole photographs since the end of last week (see photo of ingredients for a sample of what has been happening).

Click Here to Read M-J’s Latest Elegant Survivalist Posts

Minute Rice, a Boon to American Cooks for 60 Years, Saves Energy

Minute Rice is an Economical, Delicious and Energy-Saving American Food--M-J Congratulates Riviana Foods of Texas on the 60th Anniversary of Minute Rice

Riviana Foods

Minute Rice is available at Sam’s Club in a 4.5 lb. box, for $5.42.

M-J’s Elegant Apple Pie Recipe

Best Apple Pie Recipe, Apple Pie Recipe, Elegant Apple Pie
M-J’s Elegant Apple Pie

 

 

M-J’s Elegant Apple Pie Recipe

  • 4 cups of white flour
  • 1 teaspoon of salt
  • 1 stick of salted butter, cut into 8 pieces
  • ¾ cup of chilled lard (“manteca”)
  • 7 Fuji or Sonya apples–cored, peeled, and thinly sliced (reserve peels and cores)
  • 2 tablespoons of cornstarch
  • 1/4 cup light-brown sugar (or more, according to your taste)
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 3/4 cup of cold water
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon of apple cider vinegar
  • 1 additional half stick of butter
  • An extra 2 tablespoons of sugar, either white or brown
  • One cup of water
  • DIRECTIONS
  • 1. Make the dough: put one stick of cold butter into a large mixing bowl, together with the 3/4 cup of chilled lard and a teaspoon of salt. Add flour gradually, working it into the butter and lard. Add approximately 3/4 cup of cold water, then cider vinegar, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the dough forms small pea-shaped balls, and when formed into a large mound, it holds together. Sometimes less cold water is required–believe it or not, the amount needed to make a pie dough with this recipe depends upon the moon.’s current phase. Mix this by hand, since machine will create a tough pie crust. I use an old-fashioned wire potato masher and a wooden spoon. When the dough sticks together but doesn’t stick to your hands, shape it into 2 balls, wrap each in plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.
  • 2. Put all of your apple peelings and cores into a saucepan on the stove with a cup of water and two tablespoons of sugar, and boil until the liquid becomes syrup. Strain liquid from solids and reserve it. The peelings can then be eaten or ground into applesauce–it’s important not to waste any edible part of your apples.
  • 3. Assemble the pie: heat your oven to 425°F. Roll out one ball of dough into a 12-inch round about 1/8-inch thick, on a lightly floured surface. Fit the dough into a 9 or10-inch pie pan. Place one layer of apple slices into the dough-lined pan. Cover them with two tablespoons of cornstarch and a quarter-cup of brown sugar. Repeat this process with apples, sugars and cinnamon. Distribute the half-stick of butter on top of the apples after slicing it into bits. Add your apple syrup over the top of the pie. Alternatively, I sometimes skip the step of creating syrup from my apple peelings, and just use some apple juice concentrate (found in grocery frozen juice section).
  • Roll out the second ball of dough for the top crust. Brush the edges of the bottom crust with water or milk, and lay the top crust down, pressing the edges together to form a tight seal. Use your imagination to pierce or slice a design into the top of the pie to allow steam to escape. Bake for ten minutes at 425*F, then lower your oven heat to 350* and bake for another hour. Let the apple pie cool for a minimum of two hours before serving.
  • Elegant Apple Pie Recipe Copyright M-J de Mesterton 2008

M-J Recommends

Everyday Survival: Why Smart People Do Stupid Things, by Laurence Gonzales
Thursday, Nov 6, 2008

Laurence Gonzales will appear on Saturday in Santa Fe at Collected Works bookstore off the Plaza. His latest book is entitled, Everyday Survival: Why Smart People Do Stupid Things


A New, Versatile Product from Pillsbury

Believe it or not, some very elegant creations can be made with this new product from the Pillsbury Doughboy. It is a sheet of “crescent (croissant) roll” style dough, which can be cut into any shapes and dimensions you please.


Note from M-J: I really do not appreciate the following site copying my headlines. It is a cynical practice to garner him more hits. We are not affiliated. http://www.survival-food-kit.com/category/articles-survival